is that power outage caused by my project ?

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by patric44, Jul 16, 2018.

  1. patric44

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 16, 2018
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    hi guys

    i recentaly was working on building a T.E.A laser and i used a flyback transformer drived by a 555 timer circuit
    [​IMG]

    and the TEA laser somehow worked , but after i adjusted the spark gap and other things i tried to plug it in , then ...
    the electricity in the whole block went off ?! i went out and i was smelling a very mild electrical burning smell ?!
    then after a 20min or so the power came back .
    so my question : is this just a really strange coincidence or my apparatus was the cause of it ?
    ( maybe the HV capacitor in the TEA made something !!! i don't know ) i can't think of any reason ?
     
  2. dl324

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Welcome to AAC!
    Purely coincidence.

    Breakers would have tripped in your power distribution panel before you could have caused an overload on the utility company distribution network.

    One of my neighbors once put a tree on the power line and took out power for our neighborhood. That wasn't a coincidence, and the power company was naming names, so we know who it was and that he was cutting down a tree...
     
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  3. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    I VERY much doubt that any high current your device would have caused it, it would never reach the magnitude required to knock out the distribution to your block.
    If it had there would be massive evidence in or near the device!:eek:
    Max.
     
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  4. patric44

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 16, 2018
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    Breakers didn't even flinch lol
    should i try that project again , iam afraid next time the FBI or CIA will came after me or something :eek: LOL
     
  5. patric44

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 16, 2018
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    is there is any chance that the HV capaicitor had short ciruited which produced a momentarly overload or something ?
    and what would happen it did ?
     
  6. dl324

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Methinks you watch too many movies. The FBI or CIA wouldn't be involved unless the power utility reported suspicious activity. You'd think the utility company would contact you if they thought you were drawing so much power that you could shutdown your neighborhood before contacting the FBI... The CIA isn't typically involved in domestic terrorist activity.
     
  7. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    That would be a very local effect.
    Service panel breaker etc. would be the first to trip.
    Max.
     
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  8. patric44

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 16, 2018
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    thank you very much guys for help , i will try the project one more time .
     
  9. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    I do remember reading that Tesla knocked out power to a part of Colorado Springs with some of his high power experiments.
     
  10. MisterBill2

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 23, 2018
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    Yes indeed!! Tesla did connect some very high powered loads, but they drew many HUNDREDS of amps. And the device in the picture was VERY LARGE indeed, perhaps 20 feet in diameter.
     
  11. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    I've recently caused brownouts on my street with my 480V power supply project. I have to start it up in sequence or else the neighbors' lights flicker & dim. Just starting the main 30hp motor with transformer and load disconnected draws over 400A from the 240V mains and causes my own lights to dim. I haven't measured the startup current with transformer and load already connected, but apparently it's more than enough to warrant the neighborly complaints.

    This is an example of what it takes just to make a dent in the grid. The only reason I'm not tripping breakers is because it's a momentary load on a 125A breaker. It isn't possible to plug something into a wall outlet that kills power to the street. I don't even think could do that with my big power supply. Just a coincidence.
     
  12. RichardO

    Late Member

    May 4, 2013
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    upload_2018-7-17_10-3-50.jpeg
    upload_2018-7-17_10-0-47.jpeg
     
  13. Reloadron

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    My neighbor's granddaughter managed to take out several square blocks with a few Mylar balloons which got away from her. Grandma took this picture a day before things went south real quick.

    Power Line Balloons.png

    The upper lines I believe are about 25 KV 3 phase. The lower lines the balloons hung on are about 7 KV 3 phase which feed the residential transformers. Nobody thought much of it when the balloons got tangled. A day later I was in my living room across the street and suddenly we heard popping, like a string of firecrackers followed by a loud bang. Power went out and dogs looked at me like what the heck was that? One of those lines came down arcing and sparking across the road extending to the middle of the road. This was the only time in my life I called 911. Never saw a hot line in the street like that and wondered what happens if someone drives over it. Within minuets I had police and fire for new best friends. My house generator was running fine which amused the police. Grandma told poor little Gianna (age 6) she was going to jail. :)

    Apparently Mylar balloons have caused some major blackouts. I can believe that having seen what I saw.

    Ron
     
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  14. Reloadron

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    I remember that project, how is it working out?

    Ron
     
  15. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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