Inverted ON/OFF button?

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
5,804
Do you think I would go through all of this if it was a crappy $5 mouse?
It's a $30 mouse, and very special because it's so useful to me due to its size, special buttons and quality. Because of that, I must find a good solution and repair it. The mouse that could replace it is from Logitech and costs about $70.

Also, you know there are engineer degrees, master included, with almost absolutely zero electric/electronic content, right?

Civil engineers come to my mind, agricultural, biomedical, computer, software, management engineering... None of those have electrical or electronic subjects, or, if any, it's a joke compared to electrical, electronic, mechanical engineering... so yeah, one can be an engineer and have really no clue about electronics and electrical stuff. May be Ohm Law from high school and some Karnaugh maps.

Anyway, microswitch is the solution.
For my electrical/electronic engineering degree I had to take courses in physics, chemistry, strength of materials, statics, and dynamics. Also writing, history, math, law, and public speaking.
My point being that an actual technical degree should include a broad spectrum of knowledge. It seems that possibly now some folks are only learning about how to use one product from one manufacturer. That is far from an engineering education.
The electricity/ magnetism portion of a high school physics class covers series circuits and ohms law, and power. So it seems that sometimes it is worthwhile to grab a book and educate one's self.
 

Thread Starter

rambomhtri

Joined Nov 9, 2015
317
For my electrical/electronic engineering degree I had to take courses in physics, chemistry, strength of materials, statics, and dynamics. Also writing, history, math, law, and public speaking.
My point being that an actual technical degree should include a broad spectrum of knowledge. It seems that possibly now some folks are only learning about how to use one product from one manufacturer. That is far from an engineering education.
The electricity/ magnetism portion of a high school physics class covers series circuits and ohms law, and power. So it seems that sometimes it is worthwhile to grab a book and educate one's self.
I'm not saying that engineering degrees are normally taught in a narrow spectrum and very specific subjects, not at all. May be in postgraduate or master. I was saying that SOME engineering degrees do not teach electronics or electrics. That's all I said, and I know this because a friend of mine studied civil engineering and he barely knows anything about electrics, and zero electronics.
A point I want to make clear is this: you don't know magnetism or electricity because you had 2 years of general physics in high school where you touched those subjects, or a course in college with a 20% of a semester in magnetism. That doesn't count, you barely have a grasp of knowledge of how electricity works, or magnetism.

For me, to honestly say "well, I've studied electromagnetism and know a bit about it" means you've studied the basic 2 years in high school general physics + 2 or 3 semesters of general physics at college level (where you get to study some fundamental rudiments about magnetism) + 2 or 3 semesters of actual electromagnetism courses, including electric machines and motors (EM applied, 1 semester), and all the theory behind it (Maxwell, etc... rough, 2 semesters). Any other less thing means to me you don't know electromagnetism because you will forget everything, you won't really understand it and you would be able to just repeat some dogmas you learned that let you pass the exams.

In your case, if you say "I studied history/law during my electric engineering degree", I will tell you that you don't know about law or history. Well, actually those 2 subjects are way less complex than science because you learn facts and events, or rules, you don't have to understand it, you just learn it. So may be it's not the perfect example, but anyway, in history, if you want to know about one event, you have to spend a lot of time discovering what really happened, but mostly why, how the world view was at that event time, what was going on in parallel, the context, etc... That's something only a person who's studied a history degree will be able to do properly. If you had 1 semester of broad history, you will forget 90% of it and you won't understand barely anything, you would just repeat events and facts.

That's my view on what's to know about something and what's not.

Glad this off-topic popped up, hahaha.
 
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