IGBT discontinued

Thread Starter

massanetabr

Joined Jun 3, 2019
26
Personal,

The company has some equipment for corona discharge treatment that uses the IGBT IRG4PC50UDPbF, this item was discontinued and in its place the manufacturer recommends the IKW30N60DTP.

We use it in an equipment that gives electrical discharge in the plastic film and sometimes it pierces the cylinder that receives and is leaking to the ground. And even with the protection of the circuits, sometimes the IGBT burns if it stays in this condition for a long time, we change it and go back to working normally, but recently the item was discontinued and the manufacturer recommends another item.

We bought this item but realized that it works normally, however when this cylinder hole occurs it burns directly, it is not as resistant as the previous one.

I don't understand the terms of the datasheet, to compare in depth. But what I read in the datasheet the original has Icm and Ifm of 220A and the replacement has this value in 90A. I'm not sure what this parameter is and if it's causing these burns

A personal help
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
17,297
Personal,

The company has some equipment for corona discharge treatment that uses the IGBT IRG4PC50UDPbF, this item was discontinued and in its place the manufacturer recommends the IKW30N60DTP.

We use it in an equipment that gives electrical discharge in the plastic film and sometimes it pierces the cylinder that receives and is leaking to the ground. And even with the protection of the circuits, sometimes the IGBT burns if it stays in this condition for a long time, we change it and go back to working normally, but recently the item was discontinued and the manufacturer recommends another item.

We bought this item but realized that it works normally, however when this cylinder hole occurs it burns directly, it is not as resistant as the previous one.

I don't understand the terms of the datasheet, to compare in depth. But what I read in the datasheet the original has Icm and Ifm of 220A and the replacement has this value in 90A. I'm not sure what this parameter is and if it's causing these burns

A personal help
I would get an FAE on the phone and have him explain it to you. That is their job, and that's what they are there for.
 

Thread Starter

massanetabr

Joined Jun 3, 2019
26
The equipment is Chinese and old, it has been around 6 years and the manufacturer no longer exists.

The equipment uses signals from current transformers to send the control board and cut the trip.

A friend told me that it might be necessary for IGBT to have SOA (short circuit safe operating area)

But I don't know what that means for sure
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
17,297
The equipment is Chinese and old, it has been around 6 years and the manufacturer no longer exists.

The equipment uses signals from current transformers to send the control board and cut the trip.

A friend told me that it might be necessary for IGBT to have SOA (short circuit safe operating area)

But I don't know what that means for sure
The Safe Operating Area defines and area on a graph where a device can handle various combinations of voltage and current without damage. Since power, in watts is the product of voltage and current, the SOA basically tells you what amounts of power the device can safely handle.
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
2,311
The specific Safe Operating Area (SOA) that is of importance is the "Turn-off SOA" when switching an inductive load or encountering a temporary short-circuit which is related to, and a function of, the design/configuration of the circuit (so your friend was correct).

The turn-off SOA (ToSOA) for the new device is somewhat restricted (90A) compared to the original device (220A) however the way the two figures are measured/tested are different so its hard to make a direct comparison.. If the original was being used very close to its limits then the new device may well be more easily compromised. Without access to schematics for the system its impossible to say how it was being used, but the fact you say the original failed often suggests it was overstressed.

There are alternative devices which may be more resilient. Again, without schematics its impossible to be precise but it might be worth trying them. IKW75N65EH5XKSA1 is a potential candidate; it is similar to your original device but its ToSOA is much better than the original (300A v 220A). Exact direct comparisons aren't possible because its a higher rated device so its performance figures are given under different operating conditions. It should work, but I can't guarantee that using it won't cause other problems or have other side effects.
 
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