if capacitance is mentioned in F/g, query.

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,835
if capacitance is mentioned in F/g then how to calculate total capacitance
What is F/g? I am not familiar with that expression and have no idea what connection it may or may not have to capacitance.
In mechanics F/g could be interpreted as a way of defining mass, as the force exerted on a small object by a large one, divided by the acceleration of gravity.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,523
What is F/g? I am not familiar with that expression and have no idea what connection it may or may not have to capacitance.
In mechanics F/g could be interpreted as a way of defining mass, as the force exerted on a small object by a large one, divided by the acceleration of gravity.
Iti s specific capacitance. I am not completely certain but I don't think it is possible to use specific capacitance alone to decide the total capacitance of a practical device.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,835
Iti s specific capacitance. I am not completely certain but I don't think it is possible to use specific capacitance alone to decide the total capacitance of a practical device.
That is a new concept. what is specific capacitance? If so what is the reference?
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,523
That is a new concept. what is specific capacitance? If so what is the reference?
It's particularly relevant to super capacitors and my understanding is that it give a capacitance per gram of a material for comparison against other materials to decide which has a higher chance of making a good cap.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
3,691
To answer the question, now that we know what F/g means, You would multiply the F/g by the mass in grams to get capacitance in Farads.

Bob
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,523
To answer the question, now that we know what F/g means, You would multiply the F/g by the mass in grams to get capacitance in Farads.

Bob
I don't think it's that simple. The term F/g can only refer to the active material in a capacitor, that's only a percentage of the mass. There are also other factors that determine the measured capacitance of a practical device. At least that's how I understand it.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,835
I don't think it's that simple. The term F/g can only refer to the active material in a capacitor, that's only a percentage of the mass. There are also other factors that determine the measured capacitance of a practical device. At least that's how I understand it.
At least that product would be within a potential scaling factor.
 
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