Identifying an SMD inductor

Thread Starter

mkucin01

Joined Aug 23, 2020
4
I need to replace a short circuited SMD inductor, but I have failed in finding a replacement online, therefore I need help identifying it. Lower one.

It is located on a laptop motherboard.

Numbers written on it 1R5 919
 

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AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
10,388
An inductor is just a coil of wire and will read very low resistances and, for low values of inductance, will be difficult to read accurate resistance values and may be indistinguishable from a short circuit. This is also an unusual fault for an inductor. What makes you think it is faulty?
 

Thread Starter

mkucin01

Joined Aug 23, 2020
4
An inductor is just a coil of wire and will read very low resistances and, for low values of inductance, will be difficult to read accurate resistance values and may be indistinguishable from a short circuit. This is also an unusual fault for an inductor. What makes you think it is faulty?
I had my friend who understands computers to a degree check it with a multimeter and he concluded that it's a short circuit(shown values were not usual), I honestly have no idea how he decided, but I trust him and decided to find a replacement, but I'm having trouble identifying the inductor.
 

Thread Starter

mkucin01

Joined Aug 23, 2020
4
I had my friend who understands computers to a degree check it with a multimeter and he concluded that it's a short circuit(shown values were not usual), I honestly have no idea how he decided, but I trust him and decided to find a replacement, but I'm having trouble identifying the inductor.
The fact that the inductor is heating up despite computer not turning on made me think that this inductor is faulty. Everything else on the computer shows no signs of life.
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
10,388
If the inductor was truly short circuit then heating up is most unlikely - power = resistance x (current squared) - if resistance is zero then power (aka heat) is zero.
A fault in the circuit around the inductor may cause it to heat up and also stop the computer working.
 

Thread Starter

mkucin01

Joined Aug 23, 2020
4
If the inductor was truly short circuit then heating up is most unlikely - power = resistance x (current squared) - if resistance is zero then power (aka heat) is zero.
A fault in the circuit around the inductor may cause it to heat up and also stop the computer working.
Thank you for your insight, I'm considering taking the computer to a computer electrician, maybe he will be able to identify the cause of this problem and with some luck, eliminate the fault.
I bought the computer a week ago and changed it's thermal paste, I hope it doesn't go to waste.
 

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
572
thermal paste,

lots of ifs here.


was it by some chance the silver type ?

this type is conductive, if its by some chance shorted anything, this could be the cause
 
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