Ideas and suggestions needed for a wireless electrical switch, take 2 !

Thread Starter

Barrythecableguy

Joined Jun 14, 2016
48
I must say I was very disappointed with the lack of input on my previous post I have posted again in the hopes of receiving a little bit more correspondence.

Hi everyone, its Barry here I'm calling out for your help, I am trying to build a circuit that has a circular matrix of about 40 traffic light LED's (green, amber, Red) the LED's are supposed to light up in sequence (green to amber to red) in response to a signal but as a relative novice I simply cannot figure out how to make this happen, I've looked at counters, I have looked at A-stable vibrators and even the good old 555 and nothing seems to work, does anyone have a chip or a particular chip configuration (with a clear explanation) that could solve this problem ?

The second problem is I need a simple wireless switch to initiate this sequence, more specifically I need a switch that will trigger the sequence above when it detects the correct radio frequency (that is the signal). I understand that this is quite a detailed problem so I would be very grateful to anyone who has the expertise and would be good enough to take the time to share their knowledge and give a detailed answer, theoretical or practical.


Thank You all so much.

Barry
 

bug13

Joined Feb 13, 2012
1,809
There are many ways to do this, here is one way (assuming you are making only one)
  • Buy an arduino, some leds and resistors, learn how to flash one LED, then multiple LEDs
  • learn how to flash some LEDs on different rate independently, using PWM to to adjust the brightness of independently.
  • Then look into this, hope that's what you want. https://www.adafruit.com/product/1430, if not go to sparkfun or adafruit, and find the one that you want.
  • last find some arduino wireless module to control it wirelessly.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,140
Never saw your other thread but what you initially describe is commonly called a LED Chaser Circuit where the LEDs illuminate in sequence. The problem I see is you mention 3 colors, green, amber and red. Sequencing they would go green, amber, red, green, amber, red .... to a max number of LEDs. Doing this with 10 LEDs is relatively easy using a discreet chip like the 4017 or a micro-controller and some programming. The difficulties begin when you want more LEDs like 40 for example. An old popular discreet circuit was the "Kit The Car" visually appealing back and forth display. Running up to 16 chasing LEDs using discrete components is also not too difficult. What this comes down to is your skill level being able to mount and solder the LEDs plus and understanding of how the discrete components work. If you choose to use a micro controller be it an Arduino or similat then you will need some programming skills as well as assembly skills.

The Remote part is not that difficult across a short distance of a few hundred feet. A Google of 2 CH or 4 CH Remote Relay Card gets you receivers with 2 or 4 momentary or latching relays and a few key fob transmitters. Examples of Remote Relay Cards available through Amazon.

You don't mention the timing for the LED sequencing? I suggest you start with a Google of LED Chaser Circuit to get a feel for exactly what you want.

Ron
 

Thread Starter

Barrythecableguy

Joined Jun 14, 2016
48
Never saw your other thread but what you initially describe is commonly called a LED Chaser Circuit where the LEDs illuminate in sequence. The problem I see is you mention 3 colors, green, amber and red. Sequencing they would go green, amber, red, green, amber, red .... to a max number of LEDs. Doing this with 10 LEDs is relatively easy using a discreet chip like the 4017 or a micro-controller and some programming. The difficulties begin when you want more LEDs like 40 for example. An old popular discreet circuit was the "Kit The Car" visually appealing back and forth display. Running up to 16 chasing LEDs using discrete components is also not too difficult. What this comes down to is your skill level being able to mount and solder the LEDs plus and understanding of how the discrete components work. If you choose to use a micro controller be it an Arduino or similat then you will need some programming skills as well as assembly skills.

The Remote part is not that difficult across a short distance of a few hundred feet. A Google of 2 CH or 4 CH Remote Relay Card gets you receivers with 2 or 4 momentary or latching relays and a few key fob transmitters. Examples of Remote Relay Cards available through Amazon.

You don't mention the timing for the LED sequencing? I suggest you start with a Google of LED Chaser Circuit to get a feel for exactly what you want.

Ron

Thank You so very much for your in depth reply, I really do appreciate you taking the time to help, I will start experimenting immediately with some of these suggestions.

Regards

Barry
 
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