I do not think this guy saw the atoms

Discussion in 'General Science' started by Motanache, May 28, 2017.

  1. Motanache

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 2, 2015
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  2. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    I would say that's more like a picture of the shadow of the atoms than a picture of the atoms themselves.
    But it's still a pretty amazing picture done with a do-it-yourself device.
     
  3. Raymond Genovese

    Active Member

    Mar 5, 2016
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    cool project - a home-brew STM...some similarities between his pic and those here
     
  4. BR-549

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 22, 2013
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    I would be wary of this conclusion. What is repeatedly done here? We apply a voltage to a conductor......then measure the voltage right before conduction. Sequentially. Are we measuring free charge over and over?

    Is that scanned image pattern a true representation of the surface.........or the result of the measuring method? A measurement pattern?

    Those dots represent voltage levels. Are the dots really all there like that at the same time?

    Or only during measurement.
     
  5. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
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    Something is there (atomic structure) for sure but the 'dots' are much like the flux lines we draw and calculate for EM forces interacting. Measurement requires energy so when we 'look' at something and 'see', it's because the energy state is changing by transformation. What we see is part measurement pattern (artifact of measure) and part true representation. Better instruments usually reduce measurement artifacts.
     
  6. Motanache

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 2, 2015
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    That the atoms to stay so nicely arranged should be crystal.

    Then this crystal seems to be perfectly cut after one of the crystalline planes.
    Not even an atom is above this plane - which seems hard to believe.
     
  7. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    An atomic force microscope is much simpler than a non-expert wants to believe. He succeeded.
     
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