I bought warning lights that are 12v-24v-is it possible to connect them to 220v controlboard?

Thread Starter

Chris Redfield

Joined Jul 1, 2020
18
Hello everyone,

I just joined on this forum because I need your help about something.
I bought 2 of these lights:
https://www.fedsig.com/product/151xst-hazardous-location-warning-light#product-block-1
When I ordered them,I haven't payed attention on voltage,because they were on eBay,and I made huge mistake.
The one I ordered are 12-24VDC version.
I wanted to connect those lights to controlboard so I can have extra modes (lights are bought for display).
I ordered this controlboard:
https://www.galakelectronics.com/VG-306.htm

I asked customer service will those lights fit on that motherboard and they said they will.
Now when I did a bit of late research I read that they aren't compatible,since motherboard is 120VAC .

I can't return lights so I'm stuck with them,and they are pretty expensive.


My question is:
Is there anything I can do to fix this problem and make them work with that motherboard?
Do I have any other option except for changing whole electronics which is not an option?

Please note that I'm complete newbie and I (obviously) don't have any knowledge about this kind of stuff,so please explain it in newbie language.

Kind regards,
Chris
 

RIKRIK

Joined Oct 11, 2019
93
Hi chris, The only two things i can recommend is.
A: using a 120v to 12v 60W led inverter. To get the 12v. Then buy two 120v relays and hook the output of the mosfet. Across the relays coil. To switch the 12v.

However this solution isnt great as theres alot of variables. Like can the relays keep up. Will the relay coils get fried.

B:. Look at what was least expensive and iver buy the 12v or 120v version.

Sorry i couldn't help more, if i think of something better il let you know. Someone may know.
 

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
1,175
You could place a AC to DC power supply between the controller and the lights.

i would go with a simple stepdown transformer rectified and filtered because I doubt if a switch mode supply will like being turned on and off. (although some might handle it)

Can you find out if the voltage for the lights needs to be regulated?
 

Thread Starter

Chris Redfield

Joined Jul 1, 2020
18
Hi chris, The only two things i can recommend is.
A: using a 120v to 12v 60W led inverter. To get the 12v. Then buy two 120v relays and hook the output of the mosfet. Across the relays coil. To switch the 12v.

However this solution isnt great as theres alot of variables. Like can the relays keep up. Will the relay coils get fried.

B:. Look at what was least expensive and iver buy the 12v or 120v version.

Sorry i couldn't help more, if i think of something better il let you know. Someone may know.
Hi RIKRIK,
I wouldn't want to get relay coils fried,so I would need some safer solution.
As for option B, I can't find new lights for that price.I payed these lights $350 and they came in pair.Other sellers are selling one light for around $450-$650.
Anyway thanks for help :)
You could place a AC to DC power supply between the controller and the lights.

i would go with a simple stepdown transformer rectified and filtered because I doubt if a switch mode supply will like being turned on and off. (although some might handle it)

Can you find out if the voltage for the lights needs to be regulated?
ElectricSpidey

I'm not sure if voltage for lights needs to be regulated-can you tell me how to check it?
Also,here are instructions for mother board,so there may be some info on it:
https://easyupload.io/7rnh4j
 

RIKRIK

Joined Oct 11, 2019
93
You could place a AC to DC power supply between the controller and the lights.

i would go with a simple stepdown transformer rectified and filtered because I doubt if a switch mode supply will like being turned on and off. (although some might handle it)

Can you find out if the voltage for the lights needs to be regulated?
Okay that seems like a good idea . Each light uses about 42w. So at 12v you would need two 3.5A or above transformers, can be pricey. At 24v its only 1.75A+ transformer .
 

RIKRIK

Joined Oct 11, 2019
93
To be honest mate. I would rather wait for afew more comments as theres people on here alot smarter than me. And the last thing i want to do is reccomend something wrong.

I had a look at the pdf. If they say it works with 12v. I would send them a picture of the board and ask where the 12v's in go. Because it isnt in there pdf.

One the picture theres a black terminal block on the left but i dont know what it does.

Possibly the best case is clarification on the board from the company. Now if they fob you off and send you a email it will work with instructions. Run some dc down it. If it breaks , show them the email you got saying it would work.

Looking at the pic, could he also say hes not happy with the AC isolation. Where the caps are.

Screenshot_20200701-234901.png
 

Thread Starter

Chris Redfield

Joined Jul 1, 2020
18
Can't you contact the seller and ask if they'll allow you to send them back and exchange them for the ones you need?
He doesn't accept returns and even if he do,he only had those two that I bought.
I contacted Galak Electronics (the company that made the board) and asked them if they can make same board with same function,but with different voltage.I'm still waiting for answer and I really hope it's possible to make that.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,506
I have used lights very similar to what you have. They strobe automatically powered by 12 - 24 VDC or the 120 VAC versions but they strobe. All you need is to power them with the right voltage. I don't get what the controller board is all about. That is used as they mention, it alternates outputs like what you see at a rail road crossing. You have no need for that? The lights you have already strobe.

The current requirements are pretty straight forward:
Operating Current1.3-0.60 Amps from 12-24VDC
0.35 Amps at 120VAC
0.18 Amps at 240VAC

All you need is a 12 VDC 2.0 Amp power supply or a 24 VDC 1.0 Amp power supply. Easily had on Amazon:

12V DC 2A Wall Power Supply Adapter with 2.1mm x 5.5 Plug

Assuming 120 VAC mains but if you are in a 220 VAC mains area it would be about the same. You have no need for an alternating output controller.

Ron
 
This is where knowing what country your in makes some sense. If I assume the US.
Comments.

Strobes can be wierd. Some require high start-up current. Fortunately, on the system i put together some worked and some didn't on a PTC limited Class II power supply.

You could put a power supply, e.g. https://www.trcelectronics.com/ecomm/pdf/tpc.pdf on each output, but this https://www.trcelectronics.com/ecomm/pdf/tpc.pdf one is a problem, but it can also be a solution. Note that it takes 2s to start up and that probably isn't good.

Inrush current can go through the roof too.

Note that these power supplies have a remote on, so a small 120 VAC coil relay can turn them on. I don;t know if the 2s start-up time figures in their too. Probably does.

==

I used a power supply made by these guys http://www.alarmsaf.com/ps12404.html and it looks like there are changes in the works. Each output was a PTC limited output or 24 V at 2A (the one I used). It was designed for lock and fire alarm control.
Battery presence detection was optional. A small 120 to contact closure relay would be your interface.

or alternatively, get one 24 VDC power supply and two 120 V coil relays that would handle the 24 V lamps. it depends on how reliable you want this thing to be, depends on what you do next.
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

Chris Redfield

Joined Jul 1, 2020
18
I have used lights very similar to what you have. They strobe automatically powered by 12 - 24 VDC or the 120 VAC versions but they strobe. All you need is to power them with the right voltage. I don't get what the controller board is all about. That is used as they mention, it alternates outputs like what you see at a rail road crossing. You have no need for that? The lights you have already strobe.

The current requirements are pretty straight forward:
Operating Current1.3-0.60 Amps from 12-24VDC
0.35 Amps at 120VAC
0.18 Amps at 240VAC
All you need is a 12 VDC 2.0 Amp power supply or a 24 VDC 1.0 Amp power supply. Easily had on Amazon:


12V DC 2A Wall Power Supply Adapter with 2.1mm x 5.5 Plug

Assuming 120 VAC mains but if you are in a 220 VAC mains area it would be about the same. You have no need for an alternating output controller.

Ron
Hello Ron,

Reason why I bought those lights is because I'm huge Jurassic Park fan and those lights were used on fences throughout the movie.
I wanted to have them on my wall at the display,but in the movie they don't strobe like they usually do.
They turn on and off alternately,and in later scenes of the movie,they change speed.
I decided to buy that board because it had built in ''Jurassic Park'' mode,which allowed user to change speed of strobe.
One youtuber ordered it from that shop ''Galak Electronics'' and they worked just like in movie.
I wanted same thing,so I too ordered it,but I had no idea that voltage won't be compatible.
Here is video that you can skip on 5:02 when he speaks about board and you can see how he change speed at 7:10:
I really wanted those lights to act like in that video,but now I don't have other options since I don't know where to buy that board,with the same mode of changing speed,and to have same voltage as my lights 12-24V.
I would like to buy them it if I only knew where since that company is the only one that makes that kind of board with speed control.
PS
I live in Croatia (Eastern Europe) so our standard voltage is 220v.

If you or anyone else could tell me is there any possible way to have those lights (12-24V) with speed control board like in movie and that can be used in my home that is 220v?

Every help is more than welcome and thank you all for your help so far.

This is where knowing what country your in makes some sense. If I assume the US.
Comments.

Strobes can be wierd. Some require high start-up current. Fortunately, on the system i put together some worked and some didn't on a PTC limited Class II power supply.

You could put a power supply, e.g. https://www.trcelectronics.com/ecomm/pdf/tpc.pdf on each output, but this https://www.trcelectronics.com/ecomm/pdf/tpc.pdf one is a problem, but it can also be a solution. Note that it takes 2s to start up and that probably isn't good.

Inrush current can go through the roof too.

Note that these power supplies have a remote on, so a small 120 VAC coil relay can turn them on. I don;t know if the 2s start-up time figures in their too. Probably does.

==

I used a power supply made by these guys http://www.alarmsaf.com/ps12404.html and it looks like there are changes in the works. Each output was a PTC limited output or 24 V at 2A (the one I used). It was designed for lock and fire alarm control.
Battery presence detection was optional. A small 120 to contact closure relay would be your interface.

or alternatively, get one 24 VDC power supply and two 120 V coil relays that would handle the 24 V lamps. it depends on how reliable you want this thing to be, depends on what you do next.

I'm in Croatia and we use 220v.
See my comment to Ron above to see details.
And you told me it depends how reliable I want this things to be,and the answer is as reliable as they could,because I really don't want things to go south.
 

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
1,175
Well if you only have 220 volts that controller won't work anyway, no matter how you connect it to the lights.

The website says 120 volts, so you got both wrong.

You will need to drop the voltage before the controller and after it.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,506
OK watching the video and looking closely the lights used in the video do not look to me like strobe lights at all but rather incandescent lamps. However that said the lights are labeled Federal Signal 151XST which are actually explosion proof strobe lights acording to manufacturer. Additionally looking at pricing here in the US the actual Federal Signal 151 XST strope lights do not come cheap. The Xeon strobe lights I used were about $25 USD each and I had no requirement for explosion proof. I am seeing the Federal Signal strobes for $500 USD.

Here is what I am not quite understanding. Looking at a specification sheet for a Federal Signal 151 XST: "Federal Signal's Model 151XST hazardous location strobe light provides 80 high‑intensity flashes per minute. This warning light is available in 12‑24VDC, 120VAC and 240VAC, 50/60Hz. OK, Eighty high intensity flashes per min so a little faster than 1 flash per second. A high intensity flash would be typical and what I would expect from a Xeon flash tube. That effect is not what I am seeing in the video. In the video it's looking like incandescent lamp bulbs in that you can see them come and go from full brilliance. Then in the video around 2:40 he points out the others he has are just incandescent bulb fixtures. That makes sense. The incandescent lamp ones are the ones used.

Right around 5:34 if we stop the video we get a good look at the controller board. It looks like they take a 240 or 120 VAC input and use a transformerless power supply design and rectify it. The 4 large power resistors are a good clue and keep in mind this is purely a guess on my part. I see an 8 pin chip which I guess to be a small uC (micro-controller). Think of a pendulum swinging the uC outputs alternately on two pins which drive a few opto couplers (the two six leg chips) and each opto coupler drives what looks to be a large MOSFET which becomes the outputs.The pot changes the rate the uC alternates at. There isn't much programming to it.

So actually in the video they used incandescent lamps. They did not use Xeon strobe tubes. What you have are 12 to 24 VDC Xeon strobe tubes. That alone is a problem because the controller you have is designed for a 120 VAC input and my guess is a 120 VDC output. A 120 volt or for that matter 12 volt, 24 volt or any voltage incandescent lamp doesn't care if it is AC or DC the filament will glow.

SPECIFICATIONS:

  • Supply Voltage: 90VAC to 120VAC
  • Output Rating: 120VAC @ 3.5A per channel (fused at 5A)
  • Input Connector: 14-26AWG, 250VAC at 16A
  • Output Connectors: 16-26AWG, 125VAC at 10A
  • Delay Range: 5-60 seconds (pedestrian crossing), 0.2 to 2 seconds (railroad crossing)
  • Board Dimensions: 3.94" x 1.97" (10 cm x 5.0 cm)
  • Board Material: 0.062" (1.6 mm) FR-4, with green solder mask and silk screen
  • Finished Weight: 1.4 ounces (39 grams)

So if you want things like in the video and you can power the controller which may involve in your location getting the 220 VAC down to 120 VAC then just drive a few 120 volt incandescent lamps and see if you get the desired effect and switching. There is likely a dozen ways to do what you want to do. Looks like the controller used a small uC maybe a Tiny 85? But this can also be done using discreet components.

Anyway, that is what I "think" is going on and think is the operative word. :)

Ron
 

Thread Starter

Chris Redfield

Joined Jul 1, 2020
18
OK watching the video and looking closely the lights used in the video do not look to me like strobe lights at all but rather incandescent lamps. However that said the lights are labeled Federal Signal 151XST which are actually explosion proof strobe lights acording to manufacturer. Additionally looking at pricing here in the US the actual Federal Signal 151 XST strope lights do not come cheap. The Xeon strobe lights I used were about $25 USD each and I had no requirement for explosion proof. I am seeing the Federal Signal strobes for $500 USD.

Here is what I am not quite understanding. Looking at a specification sheet for a Federal Signal 151 XST: "Federal Signal's Model 151XST hazardous location strobe light provides 80 high‑intensity flashes per minute. This warning light is available in 12‑24VDC, 120VAC and 240VAC, 50/60Hz. OK, Eighty high intensity flashes per min so a little faster than 1 flash per second. A high intensity flash would be typical and what I would expect from a Xeon flash tube. That effect is not what I am seeing in the video. In the video it's looking like incandescent lamp bulbs in that you can see them come and go from full brilliance. Then in the video around 2:40 he points out the others he has are just incandescent bulb fixtures. That makes sense. The incandescent lamp ones are the ones used.

Right around 5:34 if we stop the video we get a good look at the controller board. It looks like they take a 240 or 120 VAC input and use a transformerless power supply design and rectify it. The 4 large power resistors are a good clue and keep in mind this is purely a guess on my part. I see an 8 pin chip which I guess to be a small uC (micro-controller). Think of a pendulum swinging the uC outputs alternately on two pins which drive a few opto couplers (the two six leg chips) and each opto coupler drives what looks to be a large MOSFET which becomes the outputs.The pot changes the rate the uC alternates at. There isn't much programming to it.

So actually in the video they used incandescent lamps. They did not use Xeon strobe tubes. What you have are 12 to 24 VDC Xeon strobe tubes. That alone is a problem because the controller you have is designed for a 120 VAC input and my guess is a 120 VDC output. A 120 volt or for that matter 12 volt, 24 volt or any voltage incandescent lamp doesn't care if it is AC or DC the filament will glow.


SPECIFICATIONS:

  • Supply Voltage: 90VAC to 120VAC
  • Output Rating: 120VAC @ 3.5A per channel (fused at 5A)
  • Input Connector: 14-26AWG, 250VAC at 16A
  • Output Connectors: 16-26AWG, 125VAC at 10A
  • Delay Range: 5-60 seconds (pedestrian crossing), 0.2 to 2 seconds (railroad crossing)
  • Board Dimensions: 3.94" x 1.97" (10 cm x 5.0 cm)
  • Board Material: 0.062" (1.6 mm) FR-4, with green solder mask and silk screen
  • Finished Weight: 1.4 ounces (39 grams)

So if you want things like in the video and you can power the controller which may involve in your location getting the 220 VAC down to 120 VAC then just drive a few 120 volt incandescent lamps and see if you get the desired effect and switching. There is likely a dozen ways to do what you want to do. Looks like the controller used a small uC maybe a Tiny 85? But this can also be done using discreet components.

Anyway, that is what I "think" is going on and think is the operative word. :)

Ron
Thank you very much Ron,you did an excellent detective work!
I thought there is no difference between incandescent lamps and LED lights except that LED is longer lasting and draw less power.
I understood everything you said,except this last paragraph.
So,if I get that part right,you are saying that I need to lower down voltage from 220VAC down to 120VAC-how should I do that and does it require changing power in my home,or something like that?
I'm not sure what is procedure of doing that and how to exactly do it?

Second,you said (if I understood this part correctly) I should put incandescent bulb into lights and see if I get effect I want?
Third,you completely lost me when you said this:
''Looks like the controller used a small uC maybe a Tiny 85? But this can also be done using discreet components.''

So,to summarize-I should lower voltage to 120VAC and put incandescent bulbs into lights and it should work?

PS

I just saw that ElectricSpidey said that I got both wrong,so that controller won't work unless I drop voltage-and that is what you also said,right?
So,is controller I bought useless now,or will lowering voltage and installing incandescent make it useful?
 

Thread Starter

Chris Redfield

Joined Jul 1, 2020
18
I'm sorry for double posting,but I don't see option to edit my previous post.
I just wanted to say that even if changing LED to incandescent bulb would solve part of the problem,I still don't know how is that doable?
If you look at this link and scroll down,you should see other version of Federal Signal light model 191X that has incandescent bulb (the one used in video):
http://stevenengineering.com/pdf/66LIGHT_191X.pdf
It says: Incandescent A-19s (40W-100W)
That is normal bulb that can be screwed into socket,but if you check model that I have (I put PDF file in attachment) 151XST (the LED strobe) you can see it doesn't have socket that supports incandescent bulb and looks like this:
https://www.xenonflashtubes.com/u-horseshoe-flash-lamps/25w-u-shape-strobe-flash-tube-lamp_78.html

I don't think it's possible to swap LED and incandescent bulbs,at least in my lights.
 

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