I am stuck in designing this multistage amplifier by tonight, any help would be greatly appreciated

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
26,480
Welcome to AAC!

Take a close look at your specifications. There are many hidden hints there. 2, 3, and 6 are important design criteria.

4 is confusing. There is only one way to achieve 0Hz low-frequency cutoff.

Since this is a multi-stage design, think three stages,
(1) preamp
(2) driver
(3) power output
 

Thread Starter

bvzneutronz

Joined Jun 18, 2022
21
Welcome to AAC!

Take a close look at your specifications. There are many hidden hints there. 2, 3, and 6 are important design criteria.

4 is confusing. There is only one way to achieve 0Hz low-frequency cutoff.

Since this is a multi-stage design, think three stages,
(1) preamp
(2) driver
(3) power output
Alright I will try now
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
9,155
Hi and welcome to the forum,

You have to design a multi stage amplifier by tonight and apparently you never did this before. Doesnt sound possible.

You could start with a single stage and see how far you get.
Also, you did not state what kind of parts you can use such as transistors, operational amplifiers, etc. To design this you have to state what parts you can use.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
9,155
Yes I honestly have not its for this module I have, but I cant really comprehend it, it is on npn transistors
Oh ok so can you design a single transistor amplifier with specs whatever you want them to be for now?
Let's say 1 volt AC input and 2 volts ACoutput. Can you do that?
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
18,786
I am not sure
You did not really design this. It looks like you just threw components onto a schematic without understanding anything. This design won't work because the transistor Q1 has no DC bias. A usual starting point is to put the quiescent point (Q-point) at Vcc/2 or +6 volts. How could you do that? Here is how you can do that, but that is not enough because your output is only 6 mV P-P. You have not made an amplifier, but an attenuator. Do you know why?
1655575048153.png
The answer is that the components which determine the gain were chosen randomly without the benefit of being computed to achieve the desired result.
 
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