Huge Longshot! if anyone could identify the components

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,905
I can't be certain from the picture that the marking is caused by a flashover. You will need to get someone more experienced to actually look at the board. From the picture I can't even follow the tracks in that area of the board. In particular I can't see where the track from the + output pin of the rectifier goes. IF the marking is caused by a flashover the surface of the board will be charred so it will now be conductive. IF so that part of the board will have to be repaired to remove conductive material. If a flashover is not the cause of the problem then something in the switch mode regulator part of the board is probably the cause of the fault so that needs to be identified before replacing the rectifier. As you are only a beginner I think identifying a fault in the switch mode power supply would be too difficult and dangerous for you. It is possible that more pictures of that area of the board with the lighting from different angles and one with it illuminated from below MIGHT help. Have you actually tested the rectifier and fuse with a DMM ?

Les.
 

Thread Starter

Moondog67

Joined Jun 25, 2021
10
I can't be certain from the picture that the marking is caused by a flashover. You will need to get someone more experienced to actually look at the board. From the picture I can't even follow the tracks in that area of the board. In particular I can't see where the track from the + output pin of the rectifier goes. IF the marking is caused by a flashover the surface of the board will be charred so it will now be conductive. IF so that part of the board will have to be repaired to remove conductive material. If a flashover is not the cause of the problem then something in the switch mode regulator part of the board is probably the cause of the fault so that needs to be identified before replacing the rectifier. As you are only a beginner I think identifying a fault in the switch mode power supply would be too difficult and dangerous for you. It is possible that more pictures of that area of the board with the lighting from different angles and one with it illuminated from below MIGHT help. Have you actually tested the rectifier and fuse with a DMM ?

Les.
Thank you Les, I will post another, better picture when I get home later.

I tested the board to make sure it was receiving 240v. I then tested the terminals that feed the motor and confirmed 0v. I can test the rest of the board later.

When trying to identify the fault, should I start at the fuse and work from there?

Thank you
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,905
We have started where we have because of what looks like visible damage around the input side of the switch mode power supply which supplies DC power (Probably 5 volts.) to the microcontroller part of the board. The power to the motor will probably be switched by the relay on this board. If there is no power to the microcontroller than it can't command the relay to close and supply AC power to the motor. If we had not seen the apparent visible damage to the board we would have no reason to suspect the fault was with the board any more than some sensors that probably monitor things in the system. Us members of the forum have not even seen any pictures or block diagrams of the unit. I don't think there is anything you can test at the moment other than the bridge rectifier and the fuse.

Les.
 

HowardS

Joined Jun 26, 2021
1
I had a very similar problem with an Intext pool pump / sand filter. In my case it was a simple run on timer, a straightforward bypass of the board to leave the motor always on and then use of an external time switch did the job. Could you describe what the board / buttons / display actually do ?
 

Thread Starter

Moondog67

Joined Jun 25, 2021
10
We have started where we have because of what looks like visible damage around the input side of the switch mode power supply which supplies DC power (Probably 5 volts.) to the microcontroller part of the board. The power to the motor will probably be switched by the relay on this board. If there is no power to the microcontroller than it can't command the relay to close and supply AC power to the motor. If we had not seen the apparent visible damage to the board we would have no reason to suspect the fault was with the board any more than some sensors that probably monitor things in the system. Us members of the forum have not even seen any pictures or block diagrams of the unit. I don't think there is anything you can test at the moment other than the bridge rectifier and the fuse.

Les.
Heres about as good a picture as I can get with my phone of the affected area. As you mentioned there is some soot around the board, im gonna need to clean that off before I can attempt repair.
 

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Thread Starter

Moondog67

Joined Jun 25, 2021
10
I had a very similar problem with an Intext pool pump / sand filter. In my case it was a simple run on timer, a straightforward bypass of the board to leave the motor always on and then use of an external time switch did the job. Could you describe what the board / buttons / display actually do ?
Its just a basic timer and switch. There's only 3 buttons on it.

I had been thinking exactly what you mentioned.. bypass the board and just have it always on when needed...or use a plug timer...this will probably be the easiest fix.
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,905
If the board only connect to 3 buttons and a switch (Plus the mains input and the motor.) how do you set the time without a display of some kind ? I was expecting to have inputs from sensors such as water level and possibly chlorine concentration. It makes things difficult when we have no idea what the board does.

Les.
 

Thread Starter

Moondog67

Joined Jun 25, 2021
10
If the board only connect to 3 buttons and a switch (Plus the mains input and the motor.) how do you set the time without a display of some kind ? I was expecting to have inputs from sensors such as water level and possibly chlorine concentration. It makes things difficult when we have no idea what the board does.

Les.
It does have a basic numerical LCD display. Which is just for the timer and on/off status.

The chlorine part of the filter is just a hopper that a chlorine tablet fits into and it slowly adds it while its pumping...have to manually test the water. The heater part is on when the pump is running.

I think if I use a basic junction box I can bypass the pcb and just use a plug timer. I will try and fix the pcb anyway as I've ordered the bridge chip.

Thank you
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,905
Hi Ian, This would certainly make sense for the TS's problem. As the product now just seems to be a pump with a timer it seems madness to scrap a pump just because the timer board has failed. With the very limited information we have as no testing has been done it looks like it is only the power supply part of the board that has failed. I suspect the electronics could be supplied from a small DC power supply. I think the voltage required would be the same as the relay coil rating. (I would make a guess at it being 12 or possibly 24 volts.) I think U3 is a 3.3 or 5 volt regulator to supply the electronics.

Les.
 
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