How to measure single LED SMD bead voltage from tv led strip?

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malgitobi

Joined May 29, 2019
3
My tv screen suddenly became much much darker and I dissasembled it. When I turned the tv on I saw 3 LEDs are not working. So I removed the strips and then removed the broken leds only. The problem is I don't know what kind of LEDs I need to replace them. With these 3 leds removed my strips are not lighting anymore (I guess because the circuit is open) and I can't put them back because they physically broke in the process of removing them.
There are 6 leds on strip and 3 strips, so 18 led beads in total.
I'm so angry with myself doing such a stupid thing but I'm only first year student and don't have the exprience.
Is there any way to find out single led smd bead voltage without removing it from the strip?
On the strip there is writing: SH S12 94V-0 N 1510
 

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narkeleptk

Joined Mar 11, 2019
465
Does it have the the voltage output marked where that red/black wire plugs into the power supply?
My guess the leds are 3V...


Just googling the number you provided returned a slew of information.
 
Last edited:

bwilliams60

Joined Nov 18, 2012
1,325
The strips I have seen run on 30 V but I suspect this one will be lower, in the area of around 18V. You can order THE LED strips from Shopjimmy.com using the model number or you can measure length x width to come up with the size you need to replace them individually. You have done nothing wrong. All part of learning.
 

Dodgydave

Joined Jun 22, 2012
9,203
The strips I have seen run on 30 V but I suspect this one will be lower, in the area of around 18V. You can order THE LED strips from Shopjimmy.com using the model number or you can measure length x width to come up with the size you need to replace them individually. You have done nothing wrong. All part of learning.
These are 6V leds in series totalling 108V,, see post #4...
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
6,301
For a temporary fix you could replace the missing LEDs with resistors calculated to drop the same voltage at the listed current. Less light, but cheap, easy, and fast.
 
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