How to build circuits

Thread Starter

YONA00

Joined Nov 2, 2016
3
Hi
I want to know- how to figure out how to buils circuit?
I mean,how to know where to put every component in order to get what is required?

Is it trial and error process?
Is it possible to build simulation of the citcuit and see what's happen?

Thanks
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
19,280
It is partly education, schooling, knowledge, experience and trial and error.
Sometimes you can assemble a circuit entirely from all of the above and it still might not work to your satisfaction. Then you have to do it all over again while focusing on the issues.

There are simulation software that may help in the design process but you must remember that the simulation is only as good as the programmer who wrote the software and the data given to the simulation.

The final proof of the pudding is getting the real circuit to work. In critical situations a lot of effort must be placed in component specifications, component placement, wire lengths, component package styles, shielding, cross-talk prevention, transmission line reflections, power supply decoupling and a whole bunch of other things too many to list here.
 

BR-549

Joined Sep 22, 2013
4,936
Read and study. The internet has all the knowledge of the world.

You may read and study that knowledge freely and at your convenience and pace.

There are many different kinds and types of circuits. You can build some but others have to be manufactured.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
8,956
I want to know- how to figure out how to buils circuit?
If you intend to design circuits for a hobby, self teaching is a viable option. For anything more, self teaching will be a source of continual frustration because you will lack an understanding of the fundamentals that comes from taking the traditional route.
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,076
I build a lot of circuits on 0.1 inch per hole perf board. I buy graph paper with 0.1 inch squares.
A lot of work with a pencil before I insert any parts!
Pretty much what Wendy said in post #5
I have never gotten it completely right on the first try.
It's just so much more efficient to make your mistakes and improvements with a pencil.
 

Thread Starter

YONA00

Joined Nov 2, 2016
3
I build a lot of circuits on 0.1 inch per hole perf board. I buy graph paper with 0.1 inch squares.
A lot of work with a pencil before I insert any parts!
Pretty much what Wendy said in post #5
I have never gotten it completely right on the first try.
It's just so much more efficient to make your mistakes and improvements with a pencil.
Im not talking about pcb. I'm taking about how you move from idea to schematic?

For example, I want to build schematic for 2 channles transsmiter and receiver in RF, to control the speed of 2 motors (I build RC HELICOPTER). Can someone instruct me- what the steps to build schematic for this?
 

Ewdie

Joined Nov 4, 2016
10
I'm afraid to say that having someone do it for you won't help you learn unless you have a decent knowledge of electronics already.
My advice for learning this stuff is to read everything you can read and experiment (simulators etc help if you can't afford things)

I love 123 circuits, its limited on components somewhat but it can help you get started building.
 

ScottWang

Joined Aug 23, 2012
6,827
How to turn the idea to circuit?
Draw the blocks and label the function into the blocks one by one, and using the arrows and line to connecting to the blocks together, the blocks can be as following:
1. A block represent a component.
2. A block represent a stage of circuit.
3. A block represent a device.

So now you can draw some big block diagrams as many devices, and using the arrows and line to connect them as a functional bigger device that you want, and then draw the stage of circuit into all blocks, different block has different circuit, and draw the components to be a circuit for all stages of circuits.
 

takao21203

Joined Apr 28, 2012
3,682
Its like after 5 years youd want to build circuits differently, write code differently.

Many people use ready made modules for prototypes, like Arduino STM8 STM32 PIC
But these will to some degree prevent you from problem solving instead you need to fight at times creepy libraries and wonder about code you didnt write yourself.

Ive ended up with many unfinished and abandoned circuits, of course, some of them are reworked , some others are discarded and some are mothballed.

Dropbox your source codes by all means ive lost many during the years, due to abandon and failing hard drives, at some point ive pooled all directories together and recently ive dropboxed it.

Design all your circuits from the viewpoint how well you could maintain the project, and revisit after some years and how well youd still be able to see the circuit.

My greatest mistake was trying to squeeze parts too densely as a result its impossible to still see the circuit (without a schematic.

Be very generous with space when placing the components.
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
5,895
One approach that works for many is to visualize the schematic on a blank board and "copy" the schematic onto the board with real parts, almost as if laying out a printed circuit board. A little thought beforehand can help keep you from getting into an ugly situation.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
6,504
Hi,

Another way is to buy a bunch of parts off the web randomly and then take a sheet of plywood and cover it with contact glue, then take handfuls of part and throw them at the board thus forming a circuit. Test the circuit to see if it works, if not, start over again :)

That would be fun but of course it would not work. The right way is to learn how parts themselves work and how they work together. The idea is to learn how to first analyze circuits and after you have analyzed maybe 10000 circuits you will be in a better place to make your own circuits.

If you dont want to do that then you have to look up circuits on the web until you find what you want. You can then start to order parts and solder them together to form circuits.

I wish you all the best.
 

anhnha

Joined Apr 19, 2012
880
How to turn the idea to circuit?
Draw the blocks and label the function into the blocks one by one, and using the arrows and line to connecting to the blocks together, the blocks can be as following:
1. A block represent a component.
2. A block represent a stage of circuit.
3. A block represent a device.

So now you can draw some big block diagrams as many devices, and using the arrows and line to connect them as a functional bigger device that you want, and then draw the stage of circuit into all blocks, different block has different circuit, and draw the components to be a circuit for all stages of circuits.
Sorry what is the difference between components and devices here?
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,543
Hi
I want to know- how to figure out how to buils circuit?
I mean,how to know where to put every component in order to get what is required?

Is it trial and error process?
Is it possible to build simulation of the citcuit and see what's happen?

Thanks
In my day - most people started with a crystal set, but more stations are switching to DAB so there's less stuff to tune into. There's still plenty of AM on SW, but the character of SW circuits conspire to make it harder to pull in enough signal.

After the crystal set - you can practice adding gain. There's various designs of AF amplifier stage you can try out. Next; you could try a TRF design - traditionally, each RF stage would be tuned together, very fiddly unless you have a multi-gang tuning capacitor. Many years ago the Ferranti ZN414 TRF front end appeared, AFAICR: the original was in a TO18 can, when the 414 disappeared, the MK484 took its place - that's getting hard to find now, but Toshiba do a replacement (can't remember the number).

There are all the wonders of reflex and regenerative radios to experiment with - most people have learned enough about components before they go to the trouble of building a superhet, many go off and explore their creativity in the wider field of electronics.

If radio is your thing - seek out RSGB and ARRL publications.
 

Sinus23

Joined Sep 7, 2013
246
My advice is to learn the basics and do the math(nothing hard pretty much just the fundamentals...To begin with:eek:) But this is crucial. Practice the math! Being able to ballpark values in your head while breadboarding for practice will save you much time and give you some confidence(Not to be confused with doing it as a professional:oops:)

Then build(breadboard) a lot of already invented simple circuits with few components(Battery/wallwart, resistors, transistors, LED's, 1 or 2 integrated circuits(that you have at least some understanding of how they work) ) and so on.

Read the data sheet of those active components and experiment take measurements. Modify those circuits slowly step by step(testing one two testing;)) until you really understand the purpose of all of the components(Or just gained some insight into how they work)

How to build circuits? Experience! And You'll have to start at the bottom. There is no fail safe shortcut and no matter how experienced you are you'll always find tasks that are above your level and/or focus of study/work.

You could always come up with requirements for a design without having any experience with electronics but you ain't designing/building no electronic circuit by yourself that way...

Good luck.
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,543
My advice is to learn the basics and do the math(nothing hard pretty much just the fundamentals...To begin with:eek:) But this is crucial.
.
You do need that stuff - but it can be pretty dry reading at times.

I've seen plenty of college boys in my journey through industry - without people on the shop floor who can make sense of their technobabble; nothing gets built.
 

Sinus23

Joined Sep 7, 2013
246
You do need that stuff - but it can be pretty dry reading at times.
It sure can. It makes your finger itch for some experimenting.:)

I've seen plenty of college boys in my journey through industry - without people on the shop floor who can make sense of their technobabble; nothing gets built.
Well those college boys aren't going to build it by themselves(OK that was a bit below the belt since many/some of them have done so;)) But yes...
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,283
A lot of us learned how to build circuits by destroying circuits because we were born curious about how things work. Find old junk electronics for little or nothing and disassemble it to components using basic hand tools and a soldering iron. Then take those parts, lookup their functions and see how they work to make a product. Keep a ledger or notebook to log what you design and tinker with. I still have some of my very old notes about long forgotten projects so when I'm rummaging in my old project junk box I can have some idea about how it was constructed and built.

The truth be told is, if you have to ask a question like this then it's unlikely you have the natural talent for this.
 
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