How many kilowatts heating element ?

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,399
But isn't that when you'd need it most (assuming cost follows demand)?
Yes it is, but I'm OK with a a little discomfort when the alternative is paying 20¢ or more - sometimes a LOT more - per kWh.

My rate occasionally goes negative on summer mornings. I believe this is because they are bringing on capacity in anticipation of demand later in the day. That's when I want to run my A/C, when they're paying me to run it. I'll turn the house into an ice box in the early morning and if it gets too warm for an hour in the late afternoon, so be it.
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,210
my neighbors have all electric heat in their house and it sized to run near continuously when its real cold out which means that if they want t jump it up from 60 F to 70F for a family get together on a weekend they have to turn up the heat 3 - 4 days ahead of time to get there.:(
That sounds like a good reason to use a 10KW heater and a 2 stage thermostat. The extra 5KW doesn't kick on unless you're at least 4F below the desired "stop" temperature.
 
@Hypatia's Protege
They know what their doing too - HP you are slipping! They know what they're doing
--Emphasis added--

Indeed they do!:mad: Still... Perhaps it's a game for two? --- It would be interesting indeed to present them with a bill for "reactive power" (please excuse the oxymoron) 'returned' to their grid;) --- Now where'd I put that ELF directional coupler?....:cool::D

Best regards
HP
 
On the more serious side of electric heat I would recommend baseboard heaters...
That sounds like a good reason to use a 10KW heater and a 2 stage thermostat. The extra 5KW doesn't kick on unless you're at least 4F below the desired "stop" temperature.
While my first choice is circulating hot water/radiators where the (fuel-fired) boilers are located in a well separated (cip 200 yards) building and, preferably, below ground-level (by and large my present arrangement) -- My second (and well considered) preference is baseboard heaters --- FWIW, in my experience, baseboard heaters have been the sole 100% 'drama-free' method:) -- Here's hoping I haven't just 'jinxed' myself':eek::D

Best regards
HP:cool:
 

tcmtech

Joined Nov 4, 2013
2,867
--Emphasis added--

Indeed they do!:mad: Still... Perhaps it's a game for two? --- It would be interesting indeed to present them with a bill for "reactive power" (please excuse the oxymoron) 'returned' to their grid;) --- Now where'd I put that ELF directional coupler?....:cool::D

Best regards
HP
Just get a bunch of power factor correction capacitors and load your side up to the KVA limits of your main power feed and see what they think of that!

As far as I know any modern reactance power meter should be able to tell the difference between positive and negative reactance levels and thusly register its readings as such! If they want to stick it to you for having a PF of .6 or less stick it back by giving them a return of 1.4 or higher and tell them they owe you the reverse of what they would have charged you for being negative!
 
Just get a bunch of power factor correction capacitors and load your side up to the KVA limits of your main power feed and see what they think of that!

As far as I know any modern reactance power meter should be able to tell the difference between positive and negative reactance levels and thusly register its readings as such! If they want to stick it to you for having a PF of .6 or less stick it back by giving them a return of 1.4 or higher and tell them they owe you the reverse of what they would have charged you for being negative!
It's tempting!:D -- In all seriousness I realize I err on the side of (perhaps) 'moot' principles -- still, there it is:cool::cool::cool:

Best regards
HP:)
 

tcmtech

Joined Nov 4, 2013
2,867
While my first choice is circulating hot water/radiators where the (fuel-fired) boilers are located in a well separated(cip 200 yards) building and, preferably, below ground-level (by and large my present arrangement)
That's what I have. From the boiler at the shop to the old house furnace heat exchanger is roughly 350 feet each way plus now has a water to water plate heat exchanger on the return line under the old house that sends hot water over to my little work shed another ~30 feet away. :cool:


Right. "Warm up the Cadillac, Jeeves. I need you to drive me to the thermostat."
Really? I would have thought HP would have a servant (poor orphan boy that works for a bucket of coal a week for his orphanage ) that the butler drives out the thermostat to turn it up and down. :p
 
Right. "Warm up the Cadillac, Jeeves. I need you to drive me to the thermostat."
:confused:Actually 'climate control' of the various 'zones' (i.e. floors and 'wings') is via a 'pneumatic network' distributed throughout my main (residential) building -- Whereas the boilers are controlled (at the plant) via the return water temp... Granted -- it's a rather 'dated' system -- moreover maintenance of the 'pneumatics' (especially the compressors) can be burdensome at times:rolleyes: -- even so I like it!:cool: -- IMO convective heat is the only way to go and the traditional "hot-water/radiator" system is, in my experience, the 'best fit' for larger structures:) --- Best of all - in the event of an explosion (whether owed to boiler rupture or ignition of leaking fuel) the most I stand to lose is the 'plant':):cool:

Warm up the Cadillac, Jeeves...
It's always nice to meet another Wodehouse fan!:) Controversies aside - his was the unique talent of setting a pleasant, relaxed mood -- that's good enough for me!:cool:

Best regards
HP
 
Really? I would have thought HP would have a servant (poor orphan boy that works for a bucket of coal a week for his orphanage ) that the butler drives out the thermostat to turn it up and down.
Domestics don't much like being called 'servants' anymore!:eek::eek::eek: --- Then too they come higher than buckets of coal... Unless, perhaps, said buckets are fashioned of stainless?;););):D

That's what I have. From the boiler at the shop to the old house furnace heat exchanger is roughly 350 feet each way plus now has a water to water plate heat exchanger on the return line under the old house that sends hot water over to my little work shed another ~30 feet away.
Considering the advantages of hot-water systems - one wonders why they seem to be 'going out of style':confused::(
Very pleased to meet another who appreciates the technology!:):):)


Very best regards
HP:)
 

Turbotom

Joined Apr 13, 2016
9
You can calculate your current daily power consumption by looking at your gas bills and the efficiency of your current gas boiler.
You can then compare specs and costings against other options such as electric storage water heater and ground source heat pump.
If I understand correctly USA runs 120V AC, which must make it fairly challenging to run run high power electric elements efficiently.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,429
If I understand correctly USA runs 120V AC, which must make it fairly challenging to run run high power electric elements efficiently.
All N.A. residential installations consist of a 240v 1ph transformer with 120v centre tap, so for high energy devices they are 240v connected.
Max.
 
Top