[Help] Single Input 12v DC to Multiple Output 9v AC with phase difference (3 output)

Thread Starter

Boplogz

Joined Oct 17, 2022
14
Hi Everyone,

Greetings!

We have a problem in my group and we need to output 3 9v AC with a phase difference of 60 degrees from a 12v DC input. We need this to drive our sensors.

I've tried reading and simulating the circuitry on the internet but none was able to satisfy the requirements. I've tried Delta and WYE configuration but it seems it's only applicable for high voltage.

I'm asking for help in figuring out what type of circuit should I use to satisfy the requirements.

Thanks for the help.
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,903
You do not say if you want to use an analogue approach or a digital approach. If you want to use an analogue approach I suggest starting by Googling "three phase oscillators" . This will give you circuits to give you outputs with the more normal 120 degrees phase difference. You will then have to work out how to use these outputs you give your required 60 degree phase difference.
If you want to use digital methods then Google "digital synthesis of sine waves".

Les.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
27,880
Either with analogue or digital your 12V DC will not be able to give you 9V AC unless you boost it, or do you have a higher voltage DC source? For phase shift oscillators see https://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/oscillator/rc_oscillator.html
Unless he means 9 V peak-peak.

@Boplogz Please clarify the voltage of your AC waveform. Is that 9 V amplitude, 9 V peak-peak, or 9 V RMS?

Also, when you say you have tried Delta and Wye configuration, what does that mean? What, exactly, did you do? Why do you say that it's only applicable for high voltage? Just because it didn't to what you had hoped it would?

How have you tried producing your AC voltage from your DC source?

What frequency is your AC signal at?

If you have a way to generate a traditional 3-phase set of signals, simply invert one of them and you will have the three signals in the desired phase relationship.
 

Thread Starter

Boplogz

Joined Oct 17, 2022
14
Unless he means 9 V peak-peak.

@Boplogz Please clarify the voltage of your AC waveform. Is that 9 V amplitude, 9 V peak-peak, or 9 V RMS?

Also, when you say you have tried Delta and Wye configuration, what does that mean? What, exactly, did you do? Why do you say that it's only applicable for high voltage? Just because it didn't to what you had hoped it would?

How have you tried producing your AC voltage from your DC source?

What frequency is your AC signal at?

If you have a way to generate a traditional 3-phase set of signals, simply invert one of them and you will have the three signals in the desired phase relationship.
Thank you so much. For the Answer, its actually 9V Peak-to-Peak.
 

Thread Starter

Boplogz

Joined Oct 17, 2022
14
You do not say if you want to use an analogue approach or a digital approach. If you want to use an analogue approach I suggest starting by Googling "three phase oscillators" . This will give you circuits to give you outputs with the more normal 120 degrees phase difference. You will then have to work out how to use these outputs you give your required 60 degree phase difference.
If you want to use digital methods then Google "digital synthesis of sine waves".

Les.
Thank you. I've started reading sine wave oscillator. I found a circuit which gives the 3 phase, unfortunately, the Vpp output is less than 1v.

Below is the link to the circuit:
https://www.homemade-circuits.com/3-phase-signal-generator-using/
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
27,880
Thank you so much. For the Answer, its actually 9V Peak-to-Peak.
Again, what frequency are you trying generate your waveforms at?

What are they going to be used for? Specifically, what is the impedance of the load they will be driving and how much current must they supply?
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,903
Re post #6 You are not likely to find a design online that will exactly meet your requirements. I imagine that you were given this project to test your knowledge an ability to design something. NOT just to copy something off the internet and present it as your work. I would expect if you were given this project you should at least have the knowledge to increase the amplitude of a signal.
As this seems to be a school project we help you with it but we DO NOT do the project for you.

Les
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
6,705
Hi Everyone,

Greetings!

We have a problem in my group and we need to output 3 9v AC with a phase difference of 60 degrees from a 12v DC input. We need this to drive our sensors.

I've tried reading and simulating the circuitry on the internet but none was able to satisfy the requirements. I've tried Delta and WYE configuration but it seems it's only applicable for high voltage.

I'm asking for help in figuring out what type of circuit should I use to satisfy the requirements.

Thanks for the help.
Do you require sinewave outputs? It doesn‘t say in your spec.
 

Thread Starter

Boplogz

Joined Oct 17, 2022
14
Again, what frequency are you trying generate your waveforms at?

What are they going to be used for? Specifically, what is the impedance of the load they will be driving and how much current must they supply?
We are doing this prototype where we need to input the 9Vpp to a transducer. 3 Transducer where this 3 sinewave of 110hz will be the input. The catch is we need a phase difference for each input 60,180 and 240 deg. All this will be from 12V dc.
 
3 Transducer where this 3 sinewave of 110hz will be the input.
I'm fascinated to know more about this project. The nearest I can get is something like an electronic anemometer where transducers at the corners of an equilateral triangle would be heard by a microphone in the middle so wind speed and direction could be measured? Can you share with us?
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
27,880
We are doing this prototype where we need to input the 9Vpp to a transducer. 3 Transducer where this 3 sinewave of 110hz will be the input. The catch is we need a phase difference for each input 60,180 and 240 deg. All this will be from 12V dc.
You still need to know how much current you need to supply to your transducers. In your first post you said 60° from each other, or 60°, 120°, and 180°.
 
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