Help Reading a Cue Light Circuit Diagram and Suggestions

Thread Starter

robrobrob2

Joined Apr 2, 2016
12

Hi All About Circuits Community,

I am a student at my highschool and was wondering if I could get some help reading and understanding this diagram. I have already purchased a SPDT On-Off-On switch and have 9V batteries. My specific question is : how would I wire this up and is there room for improvement? This is the switch. Also How would this be grounded?

Thanks,

Student
 

Thread Starter

robrobrob2

Joined Apr 2, 2016
12
This is for school, but as it is not a homework assignment I thought I should not place it in the Homework Help category. Yes more of a hobby thing/one time project.
 

dannyf

Joined Sep 13, 2015
2,197
you will need to experiment. it looks like the middle pin on the switch connects to either of the on contacts.

If so, the middle pin goes to 9v and the on pins go to the two leds.
 

ScottWang

Joined Aug 23, 2012
6,860
If the vf of led is 3V/20mA then the resistor is ok, but if the vf of led is 2V/20mA then the resistor should be use 430.

Cue Lights_robrobrob2.gif
 

Thread Starter

robrobrob2

Joined Apr 2, 2016
12
So if my switch only has three pins what would the positive and negative poles on the nine volt battery be connected to?
 

ScottWang

Joined Aug 23, 2012
6,860
Your first posted said that you only have one three pins switch (SPDT - Single-Pole, Single-Throw), and your circuit also shown the same, so what do you mean by that(if my switch only has three pins)?

And what are the XLR out and in, are they just three terminals?

If you are not using one switch has three pins, and now you want to use it then it is just like the connection in posted #5.

The XLR out and in, you can also use the stereo's jack plug and socket for the slave leds.

 

Thread Starter

robrobrob2

Joined Apr 2, 2016
12
All I was wondering was if the specific switch I have (linked in the original post as the word "switch") is the right or good switch?
 

ScottWang

Joined Aug 23, 2012
6,860
It depends on what kind of function you want, the switch you that linked has 3 positions with center off, if you using it then you have as these functions:
1. Switch at the left side -- LED 1 light up.
2. Switch at the center -- Two LEDs off (center off function).
3. Switch at the right side -- LED 2 light up.

If you choosing other switches there is no center off function then you have as these functions:
1. Switch at the left side -- LED 1 light up.
2. Switch at the right side -- LED 2 light up.
 

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,012
All I was wondering was if the specific switch I have (linked in the original post as the word "switch") is the right or good switch?
It will work for the drawing in your first post, however, there is no indication that the switch stays on one flipped or if you have to hold it in each position (momentary switch). Finally, it is much heavier duty than needed . But will work.
 

Thread Starter

robrobrob2

Joined Apr 2, 2016
12
It will work for the drawing in your first post, however, there is no indication that the switch stays on one flipped or if you have to hold it in each position (momentary switch). Finally, it is much heavier duty than needed . But will work.
It is a non-momentary switch(stationary?).
 

hp1729

Joined Nov 23, 2015
2,304

Hi All About Circuits Community,

I am a student at my highschool and was wondering if I could get some help reading and understanding this diagram. I have already purchased a SPDT On-Off-On switch and have 9V batteries. My specific question is : how would I wire this up and is there room for improvement? This is the switch. Also How would this be grounded?

Thanks,

Student
The drawing is kind of hard to follow. Your choice of switches is correct. SPDT, with a center off position. The drawing for that switch isn't very clear. Does this look better?
 

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