Hello! Thanks for the add! As with most I am seeking guidance.

Thread Starter

Licketysplit

Joined Aug 19, 2021
2
I have read a previous post of a gentleman trying to bypass the on/off switch on his dehumidifier. As I recall he was asked to provide additional information and the op has yet to respond. Well as luck would have it I am in need of the same information! I purchased the dehumidifier I am working with here in Costa Rica after an extensive search for a solid state model. The power goes off several times daily and of course the unit does not return to operation. I am attaching photos of the boards and only available drawings I can find. I am not at any means an electrical engineer but I can generally hold my own. Anyway I just really need to know what does the momentary switch prompt? I am thinking a contactor is involved to complete the circuit. With that said once the momentary is disengaged what is actually maintaining the request that the circuit stays closed. I have looked at the terminal where the full cut off switch is but for the life of me cannot figure this circuit out. If the full switch is made it breaks the circuit and the led's (power and full) stay illuminated however if you push the momentary again the unit and the led's turn off. I am so sorry for such a long post but I have to have this resolved by Friday evening. It seems to me that if the contactor that is promted to power up the unit is jumped all the other components will still work as intended. Again I am not a expert and I am obviously seeking help. Any and all will muchly appreciated. Ty in adavance!
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
13,328
Welcome to AAC! Thanks for starting your own post instead of resurrecting one that died.
I am attaching photos of the boards and only available drawings I can find.
No pictures.
I have looked at the terminal where the full cut off switch is but for the life of me cannot figure this circuit out.
You mean the power switch.
I am so sorry for such a long post but I have to have this resolved by Friday evening.
It wasn't very long, as far as "walls of text" that most of us don't enjoy reading. Using paragraphs to organize your thoughts would be helpful.

If your intent is to bypass the switch so that you have to unplug it to turn it off, you just have to locate the switch terminals that break the line connecting and short them.

However, before doing this, you should make sure you understand the consequences. If there's a motor involved, you could get sparks when unplugging.
 

Thread Starter

Licketysplit

Joined Aug 19, 2021
2
Welcome to AAC! Thanks for starting your own post instead of resurrecting one that died.
No pictures.
You mean the power switch.
It wasn't very long, as far as "walls of text" that most of us don't enjoy reading. Using paragraphs to organize your thoughts would be helpful.

If your intent is to bypass the switch so that you have to unplug it to turn it off, you just have to locate the switch terminals that break the line connecting and short them.

However, before doing this, you should make sure you understand the consequences. If there's a motor involved, you could get sparks when unplugging.
Awesome thanks for the quick response. As for the pictures, I kept getting a message that they were to big for the server. I apologize for the run on sentences, missing paragraphs and make every effort to change.

I am curious as to how the momentary switch works in this case. What is toggled by the switch and how does it know to stay toggled after the switch is released? I totally get the concept with a fixed position switch completing and maintaining the circuit.

Thanks for the warning about the spark!
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
13,328
I am curious as to how the momentary switch works in this case. What is toggled by the switch and how does it know to stay toggled after the switch is released?
It could be a momentary switch that has some logic that makes it alternate action. In that case, a modification would be more involved.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
1,189
"" after an extensive search for a solid state model. ""
Why did You buy a "Solid-State-Model" if You did not want Automatic-Controls ?

All Dehumidifiers work basically the same way,
it's a small Air-Conditioner with both the
Evaporator and Condenser in the same Living-Space.

The only problem with running a Dehumidifier continuously is the collection of Water.
If the Water is collected in a container, the container WILL over-flow.
If the Water is routed via a flexible hose to a Water-Drain, or Outside the House
there is no need for any "Controls", .......... run it continuously 24/7.

In the Tropical areas of the World Humidity is always a problem.
You will probably never be able to get the Humidity "too-low" with a Dehumidifier.

Why not use an Air-Conditioner ?
That way You will get a Temperature reduction as well as Dehumidification.

Just wire the Power-Cord directly to the Compressor and the Fan,
You can remove all other Electrical-Controls.
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Last edited:

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
11,538
Just wire the Power-Cord directly to the Compressor and the Fan,
You can remove all other Electrical-Controls.
OK if it has a permanently connected drain to get rid of the collected water.
This will aso disable the ice detector if it has one. This could damage the evaporator coils.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
1,189
You're in Costa-Rica,
the chances of Evaporator Freezing is just about zero,
unless there is a drastic problem like the Fan stopping,
or the Air-Filter getting clogged-up solid.

The likelihood of Evap-Freezing is reduced even further by
the fact of the area loosing Power regularly,
which is great for melting Ice.

Any machine can be broken if You try hard enough.

If You are really concerned about Coil-Freezing,
just install a Line-Voltage "Freeze-Thermostat",
they are very common and cheap,
and one more part that will probably also fail at some point.
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