Ground terminal on Power Supply output

Thread Starter

Martino Chiro

Joined May 1, 2015
107
Most DC power supply have a ground terminal, as shown here, but what is its function ?
Are there any cases in which this ground connection is mandatory ?
Thank you.

1618176878949.png
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,835
If your power supply is powering a device with a metal chassis, you want that chassis at ground potential for safety. If there are no exposed metal parts then you don't need to worry about it.
 

Thread Starter

Martino Chiro

Joined May 1, 2015
107
If your power supply is powering a device with a metal chassis, you want that chassis at ground potential for safety. If there are no exposed metal parts then you don't need to worry about it.
Thank you Papabravo.
But this is true also for low voltages as those generated by a 0-30V dc power supply ?
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
7,746
If you are working on circuitry powered by in addition to or apart from the bench supply, you can use that connector to ground the chassis so you will not be tickled or injured by AC leakage to the chassis.
 

PhilTilson

Joined Nov 29, 2009
99
I use the ground terminal on my PSU to connect my anti-static mat. That way, I know I am unlikely to fry any static-sensitive components that I am working with, even when the boards are powered on.
 

Delta Prime

Joined Nov 15, 2019
1,150
Did you happen to take a peek at the link it's a very good read. It compliments and supports the information these good gentlemen have offered! :)
quoting post #7 of the link provided. I've no comments just yet, but earth, ground, and common are about the three most misunderstood words in all of the electrical world.
This discussion should be an eye opener.
 

Thread Starter

Martino Chiro

Joined May 1, 2015
107
Did you happen to take a peek at the link it's a very good read. It compliments and supports the information these good gentlemen have offered! :)
quoting post #7 of the link provided. I've no comments just yet, but earth, ground, and common are about the three most misunderstood words in all of the electrical world.
This discussion should be an eye opener.
Very interesting link, I agree.
 
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