Fixing a broken winding on a transformer

Thread Starter

RogueRose

Joined Oct 10, 2014
376
So I have some amazing torroidal transformers that someone pried out with a flat head screwdriver and in the process they either cut through or almost cut through 1-3 wires on the outer layer of the windings. Now these are tight so there really isn't room to play and soldering can be tough with such little room.

I'm wondering if it is possible to fix these even if it does add maybe 1-2" to each section of winding (peel each cut piece from the edge where it is cut in the middle, up to the top, then I'd have about 1-1.5" to play with to solder). I'd do that with both sides and run a jumper in between.

That's the only way I can figure out to fix these but if anyone has any suggestions. FYI this is probably 16-18g wire.

Would soldering be best or would a good crimp connection be adequate? I get hesitant of crimps on solid wire b/c it weakens the point where it makes the wire thinner (max crimp spot) - is that generally correct?
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
18,999
Usually adding/subtracting windings on a toroidal type is relatively easy, if outer turns are damaged, it is usually best to remove the damaged turns and obtain enameled wire and solder a new section on and add the turns, place heat shrink over the join.
If dual windings present, they may be wound bi-filar.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

RogueRose

Joined Oct 10, 2014
376
Usually adding/subtracting windings on a toroidal type is relatively easy, if outer turns are damaged, it is usually best to remove the damaged turns and obtain enameled wire and solder a new section on and add the turns, place heat shrink over the join.
If dual windings present, they may be wound bi-filar.
Max.
The transformer is about 2" thick/high on the outer diameter - so by pulling the broken ones back to the top & bottom , soldering & heat tube the wires to the other lead on the bottom that was broken. I'm guessing that is what you meant? Sounds like it should work to me!

Thank you!
 
Top