Finder Relay turns very hot

Thread Starter

teresa123

Joined Jan 10, 2021
2
I have Finder 60.12 relay (DTDP 220v 6-10A) (its data sheet). I want to use it to switch between two AC powers. I tested the relay, it work as intended. Its coil keeps energized when using 1st power source and when 1st power source turns off then the relay turns switch to 2nd power source.

I tested the relay for auto switching, it works as intended.

When, the coil of relay keeps energized, it slowly turns very hot, even not touchable with finger.

I also tried to remove the load and both power sources. I just powered the coil of relay. It still turns very hot slowly even not touchable after some time.

The load that I want to use with relay is only 1.5 A 220v max.

I also googled to solve the issue of its hot coil. I could not find.

Please guide me to stop it turning so much hot.

Thanks
 

Thread Starter

teresa123

Joined Jan 10, 2021
2
You are not using a AC coil relay on DC by any chance?
What is the rated coil voltage and what voltage are you supplying to the coil - also consider whether each is AC or DC.
First I thank @AlbertHall @MaxHeadRoom for the reply.

What is the rated coil voltage - On coil, it is written:
"50-60HZ C29D"
"220V AC"
Further, you can check the details of my relay (Finder 60.12) in Data Sheet.

What voltage are you supplying to the coil - I am supplying direct 220V AC to the coil.
I also tried to remove the load and both power sources. I just powered (220V AC) the coil of relay. It still turns very hot slowly even not touchable after some time.

I also have seen some YouTube videos, using these DTDP relays for switching between two powers.
 
You could hook an ammeter up to it. According to the datasheet, the coil should be pulling around 10ma for that coil. Also what's the full part number? The datasheet has a 230V and a 240V coil but doesn't list a 220V coil. 60.12.x.xxx and a schematic would be helpful. I know I've jacked up going between dc and ac before and hooked up relay coils wrong.
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
10,771
You could hook an ammeter up to it. According to the datasheet, the coil should be pulling around 10ma for that coil. Also what's the full part number? The datasheet has a 230V and a 240V coil but doesn't list a 220V coil. 60.12.x.xxx and a schematic would be helpful. I know I've jacked up going between dc and ac before and hooked up relay coils wrong.
It does list a 220V coil but for DC only!
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,965
If it is truly a AC rated relay at the correct voltage, the only other thing is if there is something impeding the absolute closing of the relay armature.
AC relays traditionally do run warmer than their DC counterparts, but no excessively so.!
Max.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,965
Although if the OP is using AC, heating should not normally occur for either AC or DC coil, as the DC has a much higher DC resistance, if the other way around, the AC coil used on DC is normally the condition where heating occurs. ;)
Max.
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
10,771
Although if the OP is using AC, heating should not normally occur for either AC or DC coil, as the DC has a much higher DC resistance, if the other way around, the AC coil used on DC is normally the condition where heating occurs. ;)
Max.
I can't say I've ever tried this, but presumably there would be considerable eddy current losses energising a DC coil with AC. Would this produce the heating effect being seen?
 
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