Electron Energy and Electric Field

Thread Starter

andrewdero

Joined Aug 9, 2019
12
The electric field is measured in units of volts per meter. And volts is a measure of Joules per charge. Does this mean if an electron gains kinetic energy it will produce a stronger electric field?
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,151
Joules/coulomb is a measure of potential energy per unit charge. It has nothing to do with how fast anything is moving.
Electrostatic fields arise from a static distribution of charges and don't involve movement. As soon as things begin to move Maxwell's equations tell us that changing eclectic fields produce magnetic fields and changing magnetic fields produce electric fields. As you might suspect things get way more complicated when things begin to move especially at relativistic velocities.
 
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Thread Starter

andrewdero

Joined Aug 9, 2019
12
Where did you get that from?
Joules/coulomb is a measure of potential energy per unit charge. Has nothing to do with how fast anything is moving is moving.
But an electron can have kinetic energy... which is just another form of energy? I guess I could rephrase the question to: If I excite an electron to a higher orbital and thus increases it potential energy is the electric field produced by that electron now stronger then it was previously?
 

click_here

Joined Sep 22, 2020
190
The "joules" is the work done (i.e. change in energy)

From wiki
>the voltage increase from point A to point B is equal to the work done per unit charge, against the electric field, to move the charge from A to B without causing any acceleration
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
8,382
The electric field is measured in units of volts per meter. And volts is a measure of Joules per charge. Does this mean if an electron gains kinetic energy it will produce a stronger electric field?
The fan converts electric energy into kinetic energy. Will that directly produce a stronger electric field (as potential electrical energy from some point A to a point B)?
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,151
But an electron can have kinetic energy... which is just another form of energy? I guess I could rephrase the question to: If I excite an electron to a higher orbital and thus increases it potential energy is the electric field produced by that electron now stronger then it was previously?
Now you are talking about bound electrons and that is a whole other ballgame. Energies are quantized and if the electric field were to increase, the attraction between the nucleus and the electron would increase and the the electron would be pulled back. What the electron does is not deterministic. It may fall back to a lower energy level, or it may move to a higher one, or it may stay where it is. We don't know and we can't tell, because we can't see it or measure it. We can only assign probabilities to outcomes. The Electric field is also inversely proportional to the square of the separation distance. So the attraction between the nucleus and the electron gets weaker the further away it gets.

Read Feynmann, Volume II, you should.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Feynman
 

Thread Starter

andrewdero

Joined Aug 9, 2019
12
The fan converts electric energy into kinetic energy. Will that directly produce a stronger electric field (as potential electrical energy from some point A to a point B)?
Okay I can see that I was coming about this the wrong way.
Now you are talking about bound electrons and that is a whole other ballgame. Energies are quantized and if the electric field were to increase, the attraction between the nucleus and the electron would increase and the the electron would be pulled back. What the electron does is not deterministic. It may fall back to a lower energy level, or it may move to a higher one, or it may stay where it is. We don't know and we can't tell, because we can't see it or measure it. We can only assign probabilities to outcomes. The Electric field is also inversely proportional to the square of the separation distance. So the attraction between the nucleus and the electron gets weaker the further away it gets.

Read Feynmann, Volume II, you should.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Feynman
Thank you for the suggestion! And I appreciate your responses they were helpful
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,151
I should also mention in this context the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, which loosely stated says: "The faster a particle moves the less certain you can be about where it is, and the more certain you are about where it is, the less certain you are about how fast it is moving and in which direction". In short when it comes to electrons, you just can't pin the little buggers down.
 
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