Electro-osmotic Pump

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
4,583
The explanation is Magnetohydrodynamics. the magnetic field created by the current flowing through the water makes it move. Osmosis was not involved as any part of the mechanism of pumping. Not a new discovery at all. There were experimental submarines using that for propulsion back in 1965.
 
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nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,610
In this case it's not Magnetohydrodynamics. The current is from pressure by use of an electric field (Coulomb force) moving a charged fluid electrolyte (via aligned molecule dipoles net mobile electric charge).
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,610
I didn't say it was. It's the first time I've seen a practical experiment demonstrating the effect. I thought it was neat.
It was neat. I think the main problem is electrode erosion and fluid disassociation products from the high electric fields needed for practical pumping.
 

BR-549

Joined Sep 22, 2013
4,938
If it was such a good demonstration.......why isn't everyone on the same page.

I heard a story.........but saw no movement or proof of his words.

Why not a close-up or split screen on those stand pipes? Or colored water?

I think he is lying.
 

Thread Starter

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,289
If it was such a good demonstration.......why isn't everyone on the same page.

I heard a story.........but saw no movement or proof of his words.

Why not a close-up or split screen on those stand pipes? Or colored water?

I think he is lying.
He showed you how he constructed the apparatus -- down to polishing the acrylic. Prove it to yourself: duplicate the experiment. That's how science works.
 

Thread Starter

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,289
It was neat. I think the main problem is electrode erosion and fluid disassociation products from the high electric fields needed for practical pumping.
Agreed. Double 'DI'd water is a nearly useless material to move if you are trying to do something useful.

OTOH: It may be possible to devise a method to use DI as a working fluid, and transfer the energy to a more useful substance without cross contamination.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,347
The explanation is Magnetohydrodynamics. the magnetic field created by the current flowing through the water makes it move. Osmosis was not involved as any part of the mechanism of pumping. Not a new discovery at all. There were experimental submarines using that for propulsion back in 1965.
I missed the magnet part.

Anyone who has done electrophoresis, particularly in gels, is aware of electroendosmosis, which is what the speaker seems to describe. The forces can be significant, even at relatively low voltage differentials. I have seen gels made with low ionic strength buffers rolled up like a wave on the supporting glass structure.

As for the "magneto"part, an investigator at UCLA in the early 1970's -late 60's used magnets to cause electrophoretic flow to rotate in a circular path parallel to the Earth's surface (liquid, not gel electrophoresis). The relatively rapidly reversal of gravity negated much of the convection effects from local heating that disrupts electrophoresis and much greater fields could be utilized with more rapid separation. Much of that work was funded by our space effort. And his work was related to using electrophoresis to separate/identify microorganisms. I always thought it was ironic that his name was Lunar.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,610
Agreed. Double 'DI'd water is a nearly useless material to move if you are trying to do something useful.

OTOH: It may be possible to devise a method to use DI as a working fluid, and transfer the energy to a more useful substance without cross contamination.
Ultra pure DI water pumping is a very important component of material processing from high voltage electrode cooling to wafer processing. The problem is the required rate of flow for industrial systems. Regular mechanical pumps can deliver high flow rates at the needed working pressures for decades.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
1,616
The only water I saw move....was from the faucet. One terrible demo.
Time for a new monitor! Watch at 1080p, right about 2:44 it's very clear. And later he puts a pressure gauge on it.

I love this guys channel. He's not claiming to invent anything new, just demonstrating things that are interesting.
 
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