Electrical Engineering Field

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carter79

Joined Jul 25, 2020
1
Hi! I am about to start a master's program in electrical engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology next month. I haven't decided about my specialization yet. The areas that I consider include communications and signal processing, power engineering, robotics and control, microelectronics and photonics, and embedded systems.

I wonder which one could lead to engaging projects (solving problems/improving efficiency), job opportunities as well as good compensation. By the way, I am in my early 40's, just for reference.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
21,843
Welcome to AAC!
Off the top of my head I would say all of the above.
Which area interests you the most? Follow your passion.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,221
If you have teenage children, they might have the best advice where things are going.

As for compensation, I presume you mean income. Chase the job, not the income. Look at Jeff Bezos, he is just a Spiegel's or Sears catalog salesman at a new level.
 

bogosort

Joined Sep 24, 2011
491
Hi! I am about to start a master's program in electrical engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology next month. I haven't decided about my specialization yet. The areas that I consider include communications and signal processing, power engineering, robotics and control, microelectronics and photonics, and embedded systems.

I wonder which one could lead to engaging projects (solving problems/improving efficiency), job opportunities as well as good compensation. By the way, I am in my early 40's, just for reference.
Specialization in most EE masters programs just means you take a few extra classes within that specialization's course list. You're expected to take courses across the different specializations, and you usually have several semesters before you have to make a choice. So, take a class or two in each of the areas you're curious about and see how it goes. You'll figure out quickly which specializations you don't want. And if you find that you can't decide between two specializations, talk to an advisor as most programs will work with you -- hybrid specializations are pretty common.
 
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