Earthquake

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BR-549

Joined Sep 22, 2013
4,938
It looks like it will take time to assess. The dust raising from the city really looked bad. I couldn't find links at time of flash.

That's one disaster without a warning.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,781
Quakes are among the worst feelings I have ever experienced, a total feeling of being helpless. Then sleepless nights waiting for the after shocks. You just know they will happen but like a quake you don't know when or how severe.

Ron
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,835
Quakes are among the worst feelings I have ever experienced, a total feeling of being helpless. Then sleepless nights waiting for the after shocks. You just know they will happen but like a quake you don't know when or how severe.

Ron

Lot of quakes striking in Cleveland are there? ;)
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,781
Lot of quakes striking in Cleveland are there? ;)
I guess Cleveland had a few rumbles. Never felt them. Lived in CA quite a few years, hated those things. Worst scare I had was in Manila, Philippines. Staying at the Manila, Hilton which had a roof top pool and bar. Had to be between 75 and 78 when I traveled the Pacific Rim quite a bit. Damn building was swaying and the pool had waves slapping out. Scared the hell out of me. Wasn't real fond of CA either but never forgot that sucker in the PI. Cleveland worst case natural disaster would likely be a tornado which I can do without. At least with a tornado you need a given set of conditions, no predicting those damn earthquakes. Just a feeling of helpless combined with I'm screwed. :)

Ron
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,217
Quakes are among the worst feelings I have ever experienced, a total feeling of being helpless.
I was in California from 1973 to 1977. The tiny little earth quivers were merely amusing. A row of garage doors going, "thump thump thump thump thump thump thump thump". I guess I was lucky.:rolleyes:
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
7,987
I guess Cleveland had a few rumbles. Never felt them. Lived in CA quite a few years, hated those things. Worst scare I had was in Manila, Philippines. Staying at the Manila, Hilton which had a roof top pool and bar. Had to be between 75 and 78 when I traveled the Pacific Rim quite a bit. Damn building was swaying and the pool had waves slapping out. Scared the hell out of me. Wasn't real fond of CA either but never forgot that sucker in the PI. Cleveland worst case natural disaster would likely be a tornado which I can do without. At least with a tornado you need a given set of conditions, no predicting those damn earthquakes. Just a feeling of helpless combined with I'm screwed. :)

Ron
I bounced a few in the Philippines too. My favorite one happened while traveling in a part on the country called Pampanga (near Mount Pinatubo). We watched the surface wave coming at us over a long field of rice patties. The plants would shoot up in the air as the wave moved on the shallow water surface. We got hit, bounced and turned to watch it moving along down the next set of dikes and fields.

 

Glenn Holland

Joined Dec 26, 2014
705
My career in electronics started in 1967 when I was a teenager working on seismological instruments (which use op-amps by the carton) so I'm hyper aware of earthquakes.

I've lived in California most of my life where we have very strict building codes. However, if you travel to other countries that are seismically active, you might want to be aware of the buildings (such as hotels) where you are staying or working. The buildings in many foreign countries are not built to withstand earthquakes and you could wind up being a "statistic" (a polite term for a casualty or fatality). Japan is one of the rare exceptions, but there are a lot of vulnerable buildings in Mexico and South America, India, Pakistan, and the Mideast.

So what should you look for when entering a building for long term? The worst offenders are buildings with "soft storys" which are weaker than the part above them. If you see a building with concrete walls on the upper floors and just columns below, it's probably a soft story. The next worst are concrete "moment resisting frames" which are the moral equivalent of tables stacked on top of each other. A severe jolt can break the legs off the table and everything comes down.
 
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nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
7,987
https://www.wsj.com/articles/mexicos-moles-dig-out-earthquake-victims-1505938230
Mr. Méndez was among 20 Topos at work on Tuesday in a dramatic search for survivors at a primary school that collapsed in the south of the capital. At least 28 people, mostly children, were killed at the Enrique Rebsamen school. Three other pupils were missing, including one thermal sensors had located, still alive, under the rubble.

Mr. Méndez, who has been working with Topos Azteca for 32 years, emerged from hours of work at the site, his orange overalls covered in dust.
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,835
Proud to be a Mexican in times like this:

http://www.cnn.com/2017/09/20/opinions/mexico-earthquake-recovery-opinion-rigg/index.html

This solidarity is what drew me to this beautiful country and inspired me to volunteer


This is truly wonderful but it happens right here too. When some of the poorest people in West Virginia got flooded out, one of the most exclusive resorts in West Virginia and perhaps the US, opened their poor to these poor people free of charge, the Greenbrier Resort. Nice to know even large businesses have a heart when the chips are down.
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,835

And I have said it before. Some of the most generous people I have ever met were the very poor of Mexico.
 
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