Driving this transformer - what makes the most sense

Thread Starter

CosmicOrderMachines

Joined Oct 31, 2019
76
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So.. How do I drive this thing?

I have a few questions. First, I am told that any signal into the primary is bound to look up like a sine wave coming out of the secondary. However I was suggested to use a high frequency feedback circuit to generate the high voltage and then to amplitude modulate for the required signal. I'm not too sure about that as i've seen the device im making and measured the signal generated from the high voltage field around it. I laid a wire in the field and measured it with an oscilloscope. If it was done by modulating some carrier frequency I think I would have saw it.

What I know:
High voltage field is required
My cheap scope maybe didn't get the detail of the carrier wave
Recreating arb signal generator as good as possible

Is there any other way than this to do something like this?
 

Sensacell

Joined Jun 19, 2012
2,829
It's really not possible to say much of anything based on the information provided.

What are you actually trying to accomplish?
Frequencies?
Current levels?
Purpose?
 

Thread Starter

CosmicOrderMachines

Joined Oct 31, 2019
76
The thing I measured can light a long 4ft fluorescent light bulb up near it. It also had this specific waveform to it. I can only generate that by arbitrary waveform generator. Frequency can be whatever to to sustain a high voltage field easily. Within the range of the arb generators capability.
 

Thread Starter

CosmicOrderMachines

Joined Oct 31, 2019
76
Sorry, I guess my arb can do ... without losing too much points ... 1Mhz? I'd hope not to do too much more to avoid losing resolution, but I suppose it would be possible. Lower is better for that reason. I'm in no specific need of one or the other.

In terms of power I'm looking for something that can light a long light bulb wirelessly. No, that is not the point of the project. I've seen it done with 5W. More is better. I'll probably need more. I'm not giving a number but asking, reasonably, what power I can expect at the highest reasonable end and the lowest reasonable end with respect to parts. And is there ways to get this done without high frequency modulating?
 

sparky 1

Joined Nov 3, 2018
544
Possibly the thread starter would like help designing a coil and HV supply.
He could be asking for some feedback in order to decide on parameters.
The ruff sketch is not specific explains that it could work on less than 5 watts and frequency less than 1 MHz.
It will light a florescent tube using something like an asymmetrical bipolar tesla coil.
An exciter, a radio wave, an AC high voltage coil are a few of the different wireless waveforms that have been used to light a florescent bulb.
The picture shows an adjustable gap used to gauge an intermittent electrical arc having a snapping sound.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/60/Tesla_coil_(Rankin_Kennedy,_Electrical_Installations,_Vol_V,_1903).jpg
Some have used an ignition coil with a step up to obtain a long spark.
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

CosmicOrderMachines

Joined Oct 31, 2019
76
You would like help designing a a coil. it will be used for demonstration and does not have to be perfect.
You show a ruff sketch and you explain that it could work on less than 5 watts and frequency less than 1 MHz.
I think you want to light a florescent tube using an asymmetrical bipolar tesla coil or something in that category.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/60/Tesla_coil_(Rankin_Kennedy,_Electrical_Installations,_Vol_V,_1903).jpg
Yes, well I'll probably need over 5 watts. And I'm looking to have the high voltage output the same signal as my input. Bipolar tesla coil indeed.
 

Thread Starter

CosmicOrderMachines

Joined Oct 31, 2019
76
We still have almost no idea what you are talking about?

What is the "thing"?
Device my buddy conjured up

Possibly the thread starter would like help designing a coil and HV supply.
He could be asking for some feedback in order to decide on parameters.
The ruff sketch is not specific explains that it could work on less than 5 watts and frequency less than 1 MHz.
It will light a florescent tube using something like an asymmetrical bipolar tesla coil.
An exciter, a radio wave, an AC high voltage coil are a few of the different wireless waveforms that have been used to light a florescent bulb.
The picture shows an adjustable gap used to gauge an intermittent electrical arc having a snapping sound.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/60/Tesla_coil_(Rankin_Kennedy,_Electrical_Installations,_Vol_V,_1903).jpg
Some have used an ignition coil with a step up to obtain a long spark.
Ahh,
Thanks for the reply. Parameters.. are second step. I'm sorry and that drawing, there is no spark gap on this. It is solely meant to generate a high voltage waveform field from a bipolar tesla coil. Curiously I have been told it is not possible due to a tesla coil configuration "smoothing" out the waveform. Therefore any real high voltage field around the coil would not resemble my waveform input. I am asking if this is the case, if there is any work a rounds for it? It is confusing. There has to be because I wirelessly measured the signal in the field around the same device. The signal was just fine not smoothed out.

Last time I explained myself I explained it as if resonance was going to drive the field. But Actually is resonance going to drive this field? Can a high voltage transformer be used to create the high voltage signal and then fed into something like this just to solely get those effects of a wide area electric field?
 
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