Does anyone know what this is?

Thread Starter

RAMBO999

Joined Feb 26, 2018
127
Morning all

Looks like a capacitor. Has capacitor-like temperature marking on it but nothing else except the mark 6NPJ.

The location on the board is marked CT01. All the capacitors on the board are marked CP**.

I am trying to figure out what I would replace it with.

Anyone know what this is?

Cheers
 

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Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
3,942
A picture of the whole thing would be useful. If you can show the traces of the board, or better yet, if you have the schematic - that would shed a ton of light on this device. But I'm with @Alec_t, why replace if you don't know what it is? And if you don't know what it is - how do you know it needs to be replaced?

Fully diagnose the problem BEFORE you start fixing it.
 

Thread Starter

RAMBO999

Joined Feb 26, 2018
127
A picture of the whole thing would be useful. If you can show the traces of the board, or better yet, if you have the schematic - that would shed a ton of light on this device. But I'm with @Alec_t, why replace if you don't know what it is? And if you don't know what it is - how do you know it needs to be replaced?

Fully diagnose the problem BEFORE you start fixing it.
I'm not sure how you guys reached the conclusion that I haven't performed a complete diagnosis of my problem from what I wrote in my post. Maybe you could explain.

If I had the schematic I would know what it is.

This board had one faulty cap.

Preventative maintenence? It's a big thing in the world of auto mechanics. You replace things BEFORE they cause a probem. Also, while you have something stripped down you replace parts that can be replaced with minimum fuss and expense. It's routine. It's also good practise.

I have replaced 3 caps on the board. That incudes the faulty one.

The fourth component I would like to replace too. If I can verify what it actually is. If I can't I will leave it be.

It is the small component in the bottom left hand corner of the board. Right up against the black box.

It is probably a cap but the markings are unfamiliar to me. They don't appear to be a standard that I
can find any place. Also the fact that the location is marked CT** not CP** is curious too.
 

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Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
3,942
First, my apologies for assuming you haven't fully diagnosed it. It's understandable wanting to replace things when you have them open. Timing belt bad? Replace the water pump while you're in there. Just makes good sense. Fixing electronics that haven't gone bad yet? Well, not so sure the same rule applies. But hey! Nothing says you can't replace parts if you chose to.

I'm wondering if the critical nomenclature is facing the black box. My guess would be it isn't, because what looks like the negative lead indicator is against the box, forcing the numbers to be apparent. However, and the photo isn't clear enough on that component, if it IS a cap then it should have the same sort of rupture lines the other caps have on their tops. They're there to allow the cap to rupture if something goes wrong, as opposed to the cap exploding. I don't quite see them present on this questionable component. If you're intent on removing and replacing it - then go ahead and remove it. Just don't damage the PCB. Once it's out you might have a better chance to read the labels, or to test it and see if you can determine exactly what it is. For my money, I can't tell for sure. I'd pull it out just to know for sure.

Another possibility would be to check for the manufacturers logo. If you know who built it you might be able to find some cross reference material on their website.
 

Thread Starter

RAMBO999

Joined Feb 26, 2018
127
First, my apologies for assuming you haven't fully diagnosed it. It's understandable wanting to replace things when you have them open. Timing belt bad? Replace the water pump while you're in there. Just makes good sense. Fixing electronics that haven't gone bad yet? Well, not so sure the same rule applies. But hey! Nothing says you can't replace parts if you chose to.

I'm wondering if the critical nomenclature is facing the black box. My guess would be it isn't, because what looks like the negative lead indicator is against the box, forcing the numbers to be apparent. However, and the photo isn't clear enough on that component, if it IS a cap then it should have the same sort of rupture lines the other caps have on their tops. They're there to allow the cap to rupture if something goes wrong, as opposed to the cap exploding. I don't quite see them present on this questionable component. If you're intent on removing and replacing it - then go ahead and remove it. Just don't damage the PCB. Once it's out you might have a better chance to read the labels, or to test it and see if you can determine exactly what it is. For my money, I can't tell for sure. I'd pull it out just to know for sure.

Another possibility would be to check for the manufacturers logo. If you know who built it you might be able to find some cross reference material on their website.
Lots of examples. Especially rubber hoses. Never put an old one back on if I can help it.

Anyway, I have had a mirror behind it . I used a small backlit desktop microscope to take the pics. It's blank. Nothing to see. It's an odd one. I've had a meter across it and it measures 10 uF. The fact that I get a reading confirms it's a cap I suppose. The three caps are 16v so I would assume this component is too. I am just fishing to see if this is a marking strategy that someone else might be familiar with. Some obscure Chinese standard for example.

Thanks for your response.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
3,942
Don't assume it's a 16 volt cap unless you read it. If the board is powered from 110 VAC then the cap COULD potentially see that much voltage. It looks to be electrolytic, so there must be some rectifier circuit somewhere changing AC into DC. Again, that's assuming this operates on 110 VAC. After all, I don't think Electrolux made electronics for cars. And the construction of that device - doesn't look like anything in the industry I've seen designed for automotive use.

Perhaps if you could tell us more about the board. What it is; what it does; what voltage(s) it operates on - that information may be useful. As for your request how I came to the conclusion you haven't fully diagnosed the board - you never said this component was bad. Changing parts for the sake of changing parts is not a good approach to electronics.

Electrolux. Is this part of a vacuum cleaner? Or maybe a carpet shampooer? And the date code on the board says it's 15 years old. Finding a replacement for it may not be easy. If it works properly then don't mess with it any further. Just put it back and hope for the best. After all, if it IS 15 years old - you got your money's worth out of it.
 

Ylli

Joined Nov 13, 2015
850
This board had one faulty cap.
So you found the bad part and replaced it. Good.
Preventative maintenence? It's a big thing in the world of auto mechanics. You replace things BEFORE they cause a probem. Also, while you have something stripped down you replace parts that can be replaced with minimum fuss and expense. It's routine. It's also good practise.
Ever hear of a 'bathtub curve'? It's a graph of the failure rate of most electronics parts. The failure rate of new parts is greater than the failure rate of parts that have been in service and working well for a while. Unless this board has been in use for 30+ years, then replacing a functioning part is **reducing** the boards reliablility, not improving it. In the world of electronics, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" is still good advice. https://www.itl.nist.gov/div898/handbook/apr/section1/apr124.htm
The fourth component I would like to replace too. If I can verify what it actually is. If I can't I will leave it be.
If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
It is the small component in the bottom left hand corner of the board. Right up against the black box.
It is probably a cap but the markings are unfamiliar to me. They don't appear to be a standard that I
can find any place. Also the fact that the location is marked CT** not CP** is curious too.
If you are dead set on replacing it anyway, why not remove it from the board. That way you can check all sides for additional marking and/or let a parts tester properly determine what it is.
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
10,607
It's clearly a polarised component. My guess would be a tantalum electrolytic capacitor.
 
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Thread Starter

RAMBO999

Joined Feb 26, 2018
127
Don't assume it's a 16 volt cap unless you read it. If the board is powered from 110 VAC then the cap COULD potentially see that much voltage. It looks to be electrolytic, so there must be some rectifier circuit somewhere changing AC into DC. Again, that's assuming this operates on 110 VAC. After all, I don't think Electrolux made electronics for cars. And the construction of that device - doesn't look like anything in the industry I've seen designed for automotive use.

Perhaps if you could tell us more about the board. What it is; what it does; what voltage(s) it operates on - that information may be useful. As for your request how I came to the conclusion you haven't fully diagnosed the board - you never said this component was bad. Changing parts for the sake of changing parts is not a good approach to electronics.

Electrolux. Is this part of a vacuum cleaner? Or maybe a carpet shampooer? And the date code on the board says it's 15 years old. Finding a replacement for it may not be easy. If it works properly then don't mess with it any further. Just put it back and hope for the best. After all, if it IS 15 years old - you got your money's worth out of it.
It's a double oven. Changing parts for the sake of changing parts is not what I do. As I explained. It's PM. There's a point to it. Especially on TVs. In fact you can buy "repair kits" of caps for some TVs. Based on the same principle. You get a set of caps and their locations and you replace them all. Precisely BECAUSE they are old devices. When one goes it's more than likely another won't be far behind. It's not a difficult concept. It works well. As for getting my money's worth out of it? It's not mine. It's my elderly neighbour's and she can't afford to replace it. Just like she couldn't afford to replace the TV I repaired for her. No charge in either case. You do have a tendency to make assumptions.
 
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