Do manufacturers no longer supply/sell bound copies of reference manuals?

Thread Starter

ApacheKid

Joined Jan 12, 2015
157
It seems not but I wanted to check.

For example reference manual for the STM32F446xx Family is available as a PDF but it seems there is no printed, bound version.

(I pick up a lot of details when I can peruse printed books and documentation).
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,883
For example reference manual for the STM32F446xx Family is available as a PDF but it seems there is no printed, bound version.
I suspected that the ROI is low. If you really want hardcopy, there's nothing preventing you from printing (and binding) if you choose. Office supply stores will do both for you.
 

JohnInTX

Joined Jun 26, 2012
4,344
I've been able to get Kinko's / FedEx Office to print and bind the PDFs into nice books. When they had problems with the copyright notice, I could usually get them to do it explaining what the document was, available free on the internet etc.
More and more though, I just put the manual up on a 2ed screen or iPad and print the few pages I need to noodle through a particular section. The Brother HL-L6200DW is a good, cheap, fast duplexing laser printer for this sort of thing.
But yeah, I feel your pain.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,883
One reason I didn't really get into e-readers for books etc.
I still find books to be useful. After a lifetime of developing tricks for quickly locating information (by recalling right/left page, top/middle/bottom), I can flip through pages looking in the area that I expect to find the information.

For books that I have PDF and hardcopy, I still prefer hardcopy for recreational reading.

When I'm reading about microcontroller capabilities, I still prefer to print the manufacturer information 4-up double sided so I can read at leisure and markup as much as I want.

Though PDF's are convenient for sharing information on-line.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,505
I've been able to get Kinko's / FedEx Office to print and bind the PDFs into nice books. When they had problems with the copyright notice, I could usually get them to do it explaining what the document was, available free on the internet etc.
More and more though, I just put the manual up on a 2ed screen or iPad and print the few pages I need to noodle through a particular section. The Brother HL-L6200DW is a good, cheap, fast duplexing laser printer for this sort of thing.
But yeah, I feel your pain.
I am with you . I like something printed to doodle on. My solution is a little different. With every project, I know there are going to be sections of the DS I need and those I won't need. I just print as needed from by Brother HL-2770DW printer, staple, and keep in a separate folder. Paper is getting so darn expensive... BTW, that little cheap printer replaced a much more expensive HP LJ4101mfp that is built like a tank and weights almost as much. Wish I could sell it and not have to pay to have it hauled away.

I prefer a folder for each project so doodles and calculations remain in one place.
 

bertus

Joined Apr 5, 2008
20,878
Hello,

I got a HP Color Laser Jet Pro MFP377dw.
I have about 400 Gb of databooks , datasheets and other information collected over time on my PC in my electronics folder.

electronics folder 20200116.jpg

I only print something when needed.
I just bought a pack of 5 X 500 sheets 80 grams of A4 for about 35 Euro.

Bertus
 

Thread Starter

ApacheKid

Joined Jan 12, 2015
157
I am with you, One reason I didn't really get into e-readers for books etc.
By the late 90's manufacturers had tended to drop all, or most, printed matter, I am glad i kept most of mine.
Max.
I recall when I was a teenager (in the UK at that time) ordering a complete set of Fairchild semiconductor data books, like 8 or so. I didn't expect these to arrive as I was not a "real" company or anything just a teen.

But they did, a great big box of books, cost me zero and I learned a huge amount just by perusing the small print.

I also learned a huge amount from the old TI TTL Data Book, there really was and still is a wealth of information in these books, stuff you simply don't pick up when just seek specific answers to specific question in Google.
 
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