DC offset in wireless power transfer

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
7,469
How about some background information on the basis for your question.

I've seen a DC bias fluxgate used to control power transfer using magnetic shielding material. The normal permeability (μ >>1) of the shield reduces flux until a receiver static magnetic field saturates the shielding material reducing the soft ferrite material permeability (μ ≈ 1 air) allowing for power coupling.

 
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Thread Starter

noelcucu

Joined May 24, 2019
5
How about some background information on the basis for your question.

I've seen a DC bias fluxgate used to control power transfer using magnetic shielding material. The normal permeability (μ >>1) of the shield reduces flux until a receiver static magnetic field saturates the shielding material reducing the soft ferrite material permeability (μ ≈ 1 air) allowing for power coupling.

for example, I will be charging a 9V battery wirelessly when I transmit an AC signal to the receiver coil there is a DC offset? where does the dc component come from if Dc cannot be transferred wirelessly? what is the theory behind?
 

Thread Starter

noelcucu

Joined May 24, 2019
5
I will be charging a 9V battery wirelessly when I transmit an AC signal to the receiver coil there is a DC offset? where does the dc component come from if Dc cannot be transferred wirelessly? what is the theory behind?
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
2,687
The output of the receiver coil is AC. As you need DC to charge a battery you need to convert the AC to DC using a rectifier.

Les.
 

Thread Starter

noelcucu

Joined May 24, 2019
5
The output of the receiver coil is AC. As you need DC to charge a battery you need to convert the AC to DC using a rectifier.

Les.
yes, you are correct that the output of the receiver coil is AC, but with DC offset. what is the reason why there is a DC component?
 

Thread Starter

noelcucu

Joined May 24, 2019
5
the reference voltage in the receiver coil is 15V and I measure it by setting the oscilloscope to DC coupling. the reason why I did that is because it has the same voltage output in the rectifier output.
 
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