DC fan save electricity

Thread Starter

mansoor001

Joined Apr 23, 2019
7
Hello Friends/Users,

Can any one tell of i run DC fan through 2.5 Amp adapter then electricity consume 30 Watts or can i run 2.5 amp Dc fan through 2 amp adapter

I will be thankful to you

Regards
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
8,331
You cannot run a 2.5A anything from a 2A adaptor.
It is probably inadvisable to draw 2.5A continuously from a 2.5A adaptor especially if there is a possibility of a surge current like starting a fan.
It would be better to use a 3A or greater adaptor for reliable long term operation.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,863
In addition, the adapter voltage needs to be the same as the DC motor source voltage specification. A lower voltage will result in both a lower speed and a lower torque output.
 

BR-549

Joined Sep 22, 2013
4,936
It depends on what the adapter is rated for. And it depends on what the fans are rated for.

So, answer these questions.

What is the voltage rating of the power supply?

What is the current rating of the power supply?

What is the voltage rating on the fans?

What is the current rating on the fans?

Then we can answer your questions.
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
5,877
Something not being said but that may clear up a misunderstanding the fan will try to draw its rated power regardless of what the power source is rated at.

A recent example is a 100 watt lightbulb connected to household wiring that can typically supply well over 1,000 watts still only draws the 100 watts it was designed to draw.

To reduce the current drawn by your fan you need ti reduce the voltage to the fan. This will not wotk well with some kinds of motors.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,863
Something not being said but that may clear up a misunderstanding the fan will try to draw its rated power regardless of what the power source is rated at.

A recent example is a 100 watt lightbulb connected to household wiring that can typically supply well over 1,000 watts still only draws the 100 watts it was designed to draw.

To reduce the current drawn by your fan you need ti reduce the voltage to the fan. This will not wotk well with some kinds of motors.
If reducing the voltage supplied to the fan motor is not convenient then reducing the power by using a PWM controller should work, since the fan is a DC powered device.
And there should be no concern about a power supply rated to be able to provide more current than the load requires, because exactly as stated, the fan motor will draw only the current it needs, at the correct voltage. I learned that in my second grade class when I was quite young. Appliances are not greedy, they only take what they need.
 
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