Crimping tool for Dupont connectors or no?

Thread Starter

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,835
Anyone just use a pair of needle nose when crimping Dupont connectors? Or do you use one of these?



Edit: I considered pre crimped connectors but I think crimping my own would make for a more professional job.
 
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Sensacell

Joined Jun 19, 2012
2,919
(crimper_rant_mode_on)

If think about it, most connections we make using removable connectors are mission critical- if that one wire falls out, the whole thing is a FAIL.
There are so many different types of connectors, it's tempting to try to use a generic crimper to do the job, but this is a TERRIBLE idea.

1) Pay the insane money (some are $300.00 of more) and buy the correct tool for each style and series of connector, the time savings alone will be worth it.

2) If you are too cheap to buy the correct crimper, use pliers to roughly crimp the terminal then SOLDER the connection.
This takes a bit of skill to not kill the connector by flooding it with too much solder, but it's the only other way to make it reliable.

Anything else is totally bush-league and will result in dismal pathetic failure, maybe not instantly, but when it matters most.

(crimper_rant_mode_off)
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,952
I use the ones shown in the OP.
Most of the tools I have are made by Weidmuller, a little pricey, but worth it if using them for a living.
Max.
 

mcgyvr

Joined Oct 15, 2009
5,394
Without doing pull and sectioning tests on completed crimps the answer is "maybe"..
I've bought some "universal" crimpers that sure looked like they would crimp and the specs stated they should but they didn't..
They usually only go by AWG of wire and are not specific to a certain brand of connector though..

As stated in the professional world you would want/need a listed crimper specific to the manufacturers terminals you are using..
But for hobby stuff I've used needle nose pliers, universal crimpers, hammers, etc.. And always give it a "pull test" to feel comfortable about it..

But you are talking cheap jumper wires here.. Doubt its a "professional" application that demands rugged/reliable crimps/approvals,etc...
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,015
I use a crimp tool that looks very similar to your picture, that I picked up on Amazon for $30. Crimping is a PITA, but the tool works well.

In regards to soldering vs crimping; I would not solder. In my experience, it is less reliable than a mechanical crimp when it comes to assembling plugs. I assembled hundreds of wire harnesses, soldering each terminal to the wire, thinking that would be best. I had a handful fail in service. I didn't disassemble them to see exactly why they failed, but they failed (open connection). After some research I switched to crimping the terminals instead of soldering. Since then I've used thousands with crimp connections, and if they pass initial inspection I haven't had one fail in service. Do your own research, but this has been my personal experience.
 

mcgyvr

Joined Oct 15, 2009
5,394
I use Hanlong HT-213. It makes good connections and costs about $16.

.
Looks like its insufficiently crimped from here..
Looks like the insulation crimp is just holding the wire in there and that the conductor crimp is not nearly as compressed/crimped as it should be..
 

tracecom

Joined Apr 16, 2010
3,944
It's perfectly functional and has been in use for quite a while, but I agree that the cosmetics aren't great. That particular wire was solder tinned and doesn't compress. Usually, I cut the tinned part off before I crimp. As to the insulation crimp, it could be better too, but you can see the insulation bulging slightly between the two arms.

I don't build anything for NASA or the AMA...just toys. :)

ETA: The connection in the picture is about average for me and the HT-213. I can make it look better, but it takes longer.
 
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nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
8,912
It's perfectly functional and has been in use for quite a while, but I agree that the cosmetics aren't great. That particular wire was solder tinned and doesn't compress. Usually, I cut the tinned part off before I crimp. As to the insulation crimp, it could be better too, but you can see the insulation bulging slightly between the two arms.

I don't build anything for NASA or the AMA...just toys. :)
For the sake of the universe, I know it's an example, but. :rolleyes:
The cosmetics are nothing but crimping a soldered wire is blasphemous and evil.:D
Electrical solder is always a electrical connection, never a mechanical one. The hardened solder within the wire will create a weak point and the wire will eventually break due to fatigue if moved. The two metal-to-metal electron transfers in this type of solder compression joint will heat faster than a proper crimp one metal-to-metal electron transfer joint.

http://sparks.gogo.co.nz/crimping/index.html
 
I've used an AMP manual crimper for years. It basically has crimps for insulation and wire. It was like $20.00 , 30 years ago when I bought it for work. I found one cheap on ebay for home. There were issues with "stiffness" that I fixed using valve grinding compound. It should be red. http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/418/NG_SS_408-8620_C-116043.pdf

I did find a cheaper tool that looks similar, but I don't need it. I'd have to scour some data to find it.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,952
In the electrical distribution and supply when working with large gauges #8awg to #0awg and larger etc, it was once common practice to fill the connection lug with solder and dip the bare cable end in and retain heat for some seconds , this is now not allowed, they require a crimp connection instead.
upload_2017-2-23_13-26-32.jpeg
Max.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
8,912
I was taught that back in the sixties, but I am having some trouble convincing billions of SMDs stuck to PCBs with nothing but solder. Otherwise, I agree with your comments. :)
I agree for rigid board components but peel-out/peel-off forces needed to separate SMD connectors is highly dependent on the quality of solder. Normally the mechanical retention of just the surface-mount electrical connections sucks badly (ports to board connects).

 
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