Crimp connector with hard insulation PVC - how am I supposed to crimp it?

Thread Starter

dan_embedded_fun

Joined Aug 2, 2021
15
Hi.

I am new to crimping - I just ordered my first crimper yesterday.
I've also received some crimp connector female spades (see attachment).
When I ordered them I thought the PVC insulation would have been flexible so that I could crimp over it. However, I now realise it is extra hard, like rock.

How am I supposed to climp this? Did I buy the wrong connector?

Any help would be great?

Thanks,
Dan
 

Attachments

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
9,104
It looks like a crimp connector I used at one time. If you ordered the correct crimp tool there is a good chance that you can use this without problem.

Thinking about this for another minute -it doesn't make sense that a company would offer a crimp connector that cannot be crimped. Wait for the tool then try it.
 

Thread Starter

dan_embedded_fun

Joined Aug 2, 2021
15
It looks like a crimp connector I used at one time. If you ordered the correct crimp tool there is a good chance that you can use this without problem.

Thinking about this for another minute -it doesn't make sense that a company would offer a crimp connector that cannot be crimped. Wait for the tool then try it.
That's what I thought, but maybe I didn't get the right tool (I got it from another supplier).

Welcome to AAC!
Thanks!

Who is manufacturer and part # ?
This is it.
 

Thread Starter

dan_embedded_fun

Joined Aug 2, 2021
15
Those are very common in automotive and heavy equipment.
The PVC insulator gets crimped with the terminal. It should stay in place.
It indeed feels like that kind of industries.
To be honest I was planning to use it for some light electronic projects (9V max voltage, and less than 100mA).
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
6,286
With the proper crimping tool, the connector is crimped with the insulator in place. If the tool or die in the tool are not correct, it will dissector the insulator which will slide off. The correct tool will compress the insulator in such a way as to preserve its integrity.

If you prefer to use heat shrink over the terminal body instead, you can either pull the insulator off (you can do this, though it is not always easy), or carefully cut it off with a sharp knife. Sometimes you might want lower profile or a more finished look. This will work.
 

Thread Starter

dan_embedded_fun

Joined Aug 2, 2021
15
I've also just contacted the connectors supplier (why didn't think about it before?!) and they say the crimper I've ordered should do the job.

We'll see once I get the crimper - I'll let you all know.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
25,654
If its any consolation, the two main manuf products, TE-AMP & Taiwanese KS that I have on hand are both extremely hard insulation, you cannot make any impression with a thumb nail etc.
,
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
5,927
https://www.rapidonline.com/anvil-av-ct-crimping-tool-86-0528
is about the cheapest crimp tool I could find. It's all right for an emergency tool kit, but I wouldn't use it in product manufacture.
Most of the ratchet ones are OK.
https://www.rapidonline.com/rvfm-ht-225d-ratchet-action-crimp-tool-ht225d-85-0262
Some are "handed" with a different crimp die for the insulation than for the metal part of the crimp. They probably work slightly better, but get really annoying when you want a crimp in a tight space that is facing the wrong way.
Most of them use the same die for the insulation as for the metal. Not quite as good crimp, but at least you can put the wire in from either side.

The crimp connectors are known as Faston terminals and you should be able to get them from about 3p each.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FASTON_terminal
I think the first ones were called "Lucar" connectors as Lucas invented them for use in cars.

Some varieties of the red ones (<1.5mm^2 cable) don't work very well on really thin cables.
 

Thread Starter

dan_embedded_fun

Joined Aug 2, 2021
15
Thank you so much Ian0 for the wealth of information!

https://www.rapidonline.com/anvil-av-ct-crimping-tool-86-0528
is about the cheapest crimp tool I could find. It's all right for an emergency tool kit, but I wouldn't use it in product manufacture.
Wow, I can't believe it can get so cheap, even with wire stripping!

Most of the ratchet ones are OK.
https://www.rapidonline.com/rvfm-ht-225d-ratchet-action-crimp-tool-ht225d-85-0262
Some are "handed" with a different crimp die for the insulation than for the metal part of the crimp. They probably work slightly better, but get really annoying when you want a crimp in a tight space that is facing the wrong way.
Most of them use the same die for the insulation as for the metal. Not quite as good crimp, but at least you can put the wire in from either side.
The one I ordered is very similar to the one in the picture.

The crimp connectors are known as Faston terminals and you should be able to get them from about 3p each.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FASTON_terminal
I think the first ones were called "Lucar" connectors as Lucas invented them for use in cars.
Some varieties of the red ones (<1.5mm^2 cable) don't work very well on really thin cables.
Awesome - I like to learn the names of the various bits... Faston terminals... I've now labelled them :)
 

bwilliams60

Joined Nov 18, 2012
1,430
Here is some information regarding your connectors.
1) They are hard shelled connectors and come in 3 main sizes and colors. Red = 18-22 gauge, Blue = 14-16 gauge and Yellow = 10-12 gauge
2) This type is used on vehicles internally (interior) where moisture cannot get at them. There are other types that you can use for external connections that are provided with sealer and have a softer shell.
3) There are crimpers for them and both the shell and the terminal barrel will be crimped at the same time. Do not scrimp on the crimp. in other words, buy a good tool or you will regret it.
4) There are many manufacturers of these terminals. Spend the money and buy the good ones. You can thank me later. A lot of the offshore ones have thinner barrels and will not clamp down on the barrel tight enough to secure the wire. Buy good products.
5) The colored covers are applied to several different types of connector ends. Flags, spades, rings etc. the color always represents the gauge. The terminology for the connection will come to you as you use them more.
6) here is a good guide for you with excellent crimpers at the back. I like ratchet crimpers that lock onto the connector and provide a nice even clamp. There are different jaws for different connectors. You will need to learn which one to use for application.
7) Last piece of advice and I can't stress this one enough. WHEN YOU HAVE MADE A CONNECTION, GRAB IT WITH TWO HANDS AND GIVE IT A GOOD TUG TEST. If it stays, you win. You will think of this as money in the bank.
 
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