confirmation on how I burnt out my drives & advice on repair.

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
191
Hello how is everyone.

So i had a Grindy PSU fan. Annoying as it gets. So at first I don't know where the sound is coming from blah blah blah find its the PSU. Realize I have another one on the shelf. So I am just going to do a swap. Swap everything out but the cords that go to the drives didn't feel like re routing to all those drives. Go to boot over voltage protection kicks in turns off the PSU. I start disconnecting stuff try to figure out what it is. Everything is working but the drives. Realize I didn't change that cable and one PSU is using much bigger gauge wire than the other. Since this was a 200$ mistake I would like to learn from it.

My basic guess is that the smaller gauge wire like a smaller hose with more water pressure forced the voltage up well above the normal for the drives. I don't know the math or mechanics of it as well as others here so maybe someone can elaborate better.

Also anyone who has suggestions on repairing either of these drives let me know I think I can get a new board for the HDD but I don't even know where to start with the SSD.
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,851
You wrote quite a lot but you told us very little that would help us answer your questions.
The first thing I did was to search for a "Grindy PSU fan". I have never heard of that make! Then when I found nothing, I eventually guessed you meant a PSU fan that was making a grinding sound.
You didn't mention what the PSU is in or what its make and model is.
You mention "drives" and "HDD".. Do you mean computer hard drives?
What is "SSD"? I guess you don't mean "Social Security disability" so do you mean a solid state drive?
If you can give us a few concise clues, we may be able to help.
Regards,
Keith
 

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
1,612
Hello how is everyone.

So i had a Grindy PSU fan. Annoying as it gets. So at first I don't know where the sound is coming from blah blah blah find its the PSU. Realize I have another one on the shelf. So I am just going to do a swap. Swap everything out but the cords that go to the drives didn't feel like re routing to all those drives. Go to boot over voltage protection kicks in turns off the PSU. I start disconnecting stuff try to figure out what it is. Everything is working but the drives. Realize I didn't change that cable and one PSU is using much bigger gauge wire than the other. Since this was a 200$ mistake I would like to learn from it.

My basic guess is that the smaller gauge wire like a smaller hose with more water pressure forced the voltage up well above the normal for the drives. I don't know the math or mechanics of it as well as others here so maybe someone can elaborate better.

Also anyone who has suggestions on repairing either of these drives let me know I think I can get a new board for the HDD but I don't even know where to start with the SSD.
how about sending us a picture of the setup ?
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,851
If you have damaged the electronics of a hard disk drive that contains important files, it will be difficult to repair it. The best way would be to buy an identical drive, and change the old drive over to the new electronics.
If you have damaged a solid state drive, you can now call it a an expensive paper weight.
I doubt very much that the difference in wire gauge caused the problem. If the wire was different, it definitely was not a direct replacement power supply and most likely had other differences too.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,917
My basic guess is that the smaller gauge wire like a smaller hose with more water pressure forced the voltage up well above the normal for the drives. I don't know the math or mechanics of it as well as others here so maybe someone can elaborate better.
A smaller gauge wire would have higher resistance and cause more voltage drop.

Do yourself a favor and stop using the water analogy. It's insufficient and will just confuse you more.
 

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
191
You wrote quite a lot but you told us very little that would help us answer your questions.
The first thing I did was to search for a "Grindy PSU fan". I have never heard of that make! Then when I found nothing, I eventually guessed you meant a PSU fan that was making a grinding sound.
You didn't mention what the PSU is in or what its make and model is.
You mention "drives" and "HDD".. Do you mean computer hard drives?
What is "SSD"? I guess you don't mean "Social Security disability" so do you mean a solid state drive?
If you can give us a few concise clues, we may be able to help.
Regards,
Keith
LoL

I am very surprised I confused you. I think its very obvious when I put on my computer hat that I mean Solid state drives etc.
 

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
191
If you have damaged the electronics of a hard disk drive that contains important files, it will be difficult to repair it. The best way would be to buy an identical drive, and change the old drive over to the new electronics.
If you have damaged a solid state drive, you can now call it a an expensive paper weight.
I doubt very much that the difference in wire gauge caused the problem. If the wire was different, it definitely was not a direct replacement power supply and most likely had other differences too.
Your correct it was not a one to one but it was 80 Gold plus to an 80 gold plus! so that is why I said one to one. would you like the brands and models.
 

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
191
A smaller gauge wire would have higher resistance and cause more voltage drop.

Do yourself a favor and stop using the water analogy. It's insufficient and will just confuse you more.

I've only played with the math a little bit. My first instinct was that the smaller wire increased current. Is that correct? If voltage is the key metric why would higher current have killed my drives.
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,851
Your correct it was not a one to one but it was 80 Gold plus to an 80 gold plus! so that is why I said one to one. would you like the brands and models.
"80 Gold Plus" is a quality rating not a type. No, I don't need the model numbers but maybe you should check their spec sheets to see what the differences are before you damage any more equipment. You could replace the noisy fan with the one from the spare supply until you can find a replacement for it.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,917
My first instinct was that the smaller wire increased current. Is that correct?
No. Smaller wire would have more voltage drop. Voltage is also important. Ohm's Law is used to calculate voltage, current, or resistance when you know the other two quantities.

It takes years of education to understand enough about electronics to be good at it. If electronics was easy, everyone would be an electrical engineer making 6 figure salaries.
If voltage is the key metric why would higher current have killed my drives.
Voltage and current both matter. If you had 12V with no current, the fan wouldn't work. If you had the capability of 100 amps at 0V, the fan wouldn't work.
 

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
191
"80 Gold Plus" is a quality rating not a type. No, I don't need the model numbers but maybe you should check their spec sheets to see what the differences are before you damage any more equipment. You could replace the noisy fan with the one from the spare supply until you can find a replacement for it.
I don't think I have the info anymore but maybe I can look it up online.
 

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
191
It takes years of education to understand enough about electronics to be good at it. If electronics was easy, everyone would be an electrical engineer making 6 figure salaries.
You have that backward If everyone could do it no electrical engineer would make six figures. Ultimately, the question is still unanswered.

Why would a smaller wire frag the drive?
 

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
191
bump. or maybe it all just runs on magic and I need to sacrifice a chicken to fix these kinds of problems.
 
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