Complementary IC for 4017 suggestions

Thread Starter

deepakdpadhi

Joined Sep 29, 2018
19
Hey guys,
I need an IC that gives 0 at the respective pin when the pulse is at that point. Like the 4017 gives 1 at o/p pin 1 then with first clock pulse only o/p pin 2 gives 1. I want an that can do the complement of that, i.e, give 0 at the clock pulse and keep shifting the 0 at the clock pulse. The rest of the output pins are to be 1 when they're not 0.

Please help me ASAP.
I'm a real noob with ICs so forgive me for any mistakes I might have made.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
6,189
Why don’t you use two 4049 CMOX Hex Inverter chips? Connect each output of the 4017 to an inverter input. Then, the output of the inverter is the value you desire. An inverter is the same as a NOT gate.
 

Thread Starter

deepakdpadhi

Joined Sep 29, 2018
19
Why don’t you use two 4049 CMOX Hex Inverter chips? Connect each output of the 4017 to an inverter input. Then, the output of the inverter is the value you desire. An inverter is the same as a NOT gate.
I need to use this setup to run through the cathodes of an led matrix, Does that change things in terms of current?
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
6,189
I need to use this setup to run through the cathodes of an led matrix, Does that change things in terms of current?
No, but you can check the datasheet of the two ICs. What are the current requirements for the IC outputs?

Another approach is to drive NPN transistors instead of using inverters. A ‘1’ output to a transistor would switch your load to ground (effectively a ‘0’ output).

To determine the best option. I’d have to know the operating voltage of the 4017 and the maximum current draw of your LEDs.

Please provide a schematic showing the load and it’s connections
 

Thread Starter

deepakdpadhi

Joined Sep 29, 2018
19
No, but you can check the datasheet of the two ICs. What are the current requirements for the IC outputs?

Another approach is to drive NPN transistors instead of using inverters. A ‘1’ output to a transistor would switch your load to ground (effectively a ‘0’ output).

To determine the best option. I’d have to know the operating voltage of the 4017 and the maximum current draw of your LEDs.

Please provide a schematic showing the load and it’s connections
https://www.amazon.in/INVENTO-4pin-3V-Tri-Colors-Multicolour/dp/B07G6L31D1/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1551284327&sr=8-1&keywords=invento+rgb+led
16 of these connected together by the cathode would be the max load for a single pin. But I don't know how to figure out the current draw, without damaging the LEDs.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
6,189
https://www.amazon.in/INVENTO-4pin-3V-Tri-Colors-Multicolour/dp/B07G6L31D1/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1551284327&sr=8-1&keywords=invento+rgb+led
16 of these connected together by the cathode would be the max load for a single pin. But I don't know how to figure out the current draw, without damaging the LEDs.
Unfortunately, the Indian Amazon site does not reference the current draw of the LED, nor the current draw of each color. And I haven’t been able to find it here. It will differ by color. Whatever it is, you’d need to multiply it/them by 16 to get the current draw.

If you have the LEDs already, you could breadboard one with a 5V supply and appropriate resistor. Then you can directly measure the current.

One skill level question. Can you calculate the appropriate resistor?

Additional, we’ll need to know if more than one color is activated at one time? Plus, how are you going to supply power to the different (per color) anodes?
 

Thread Starter

deepakdpadhi

Joined Sep 29, 2018
19
Unfortunately, the Indian Amazon site does not reference the current draw of the LED, nor the current draw of each color. And I haven’t been able to find it here. It will differ by color. Whatever it is, you’d need to multiply it/them by 16 to get the current draw.

If you have the LEDs already, you could breadboard one with a 5V supply and appropriate resistor. Then you can directly measure the current.

One skill level question. Can you calculate the appropriate resistor?

Additional, we’ll need to know if more than one color is activated at one time? Plus, how are you going to supply power to the different (per color) anodes?
I approximated it to 30 ohm for r and 20 ohms for gb, to allow less than max current, for 1 LED.
Can't figure out how it would work in series with 15 other LEDs.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
6,189
And what’s the voltage? Knowing voltage of the duly, the forward voltage of the LEDs and resistance, you can calculate the current of one LED. Since you have 16 LEDs in parallel, the current draw per “pin” is 16 times the current of one LED.

I need to go to work. If you reply with the voltage you’re using, I can supply more information later.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
6,189
You probably can’t run 16 LEDs in series. GB LEDs in series would require more than a supply voltage of 48VDC. My question of how many volts you’re using for the supply is even more important. Bye for now
 

eetech00

Joined Jun 8, 2013
1,836

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
8,310
Pretty sure these LEDs have current limiting built-in. You can test for this by connecting only the red LED to a 5 V source with a 150 to 220 ohm resistor in series, and measure the voltage across the resistor. Then repeat with a 10 ohm resistor.

ak
 
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