Capacitor replacement, malfunctioning laboratory power supply

Why did the condensers burn?

  • the capacitors were not right ...

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • because at the beginning I gave 110V and then 220V

    Votes: 1 100.0%

  • Total voters
    1

Thread Starter

Sirol

Joined Nov 1, 2017
22
Hi, i have a problem, i have buy a laboratory power supply, than when i wanted try it, there was an explosion of smoke, :eek::D
as a result two condensers burned, I checked it is fortunately only those who broke.
Now when i try it, i had set everything as manual, but the power left me a little perplexed, the switch was initially set for 110V. so it changed to 220V, but in any case both the capacitors are broken, now the question is why they burned? I am attaching photos to make the facts better ...

P.s.
when I tried it, and it was on it was on 110V and then changed it to 220V
 

Attachments

Ramussons

Joined May 3, 2013
828
What is the AC power supply in your place? If it 220 V, then the answer is obvious. The 200 V capacitors must have faced 350 Volts DC and "broke". Lucky that they did'nt explode.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,398
...the switch was initially set for 110V. so it changed to 220V, but in any case both the capacitors are broken, now the question is why they burned?
Are you surprised? You supplied it twice the voltage it was expecting and this blew the capacitors. If you’re lucky, that’s the only damage but I would not hold my breath.
 

Thread Starter

Sirol

Joined Nov 1, 2017
22
Are you surprised? You supplied it twice the voltage it was expecting and this blew the capacitors. If you’re lucky, that’s the only damage but I would not hold my breath.
Are you saying that the capacitors were not right then?
But if so, it is the producer who was wrong, because the AC DC power supply was new...
 

Thread Starter

Sirol

Joined Nov 1, 2017
22
What is the AC power supply in your place? If it 220 V, then the answer is obvious. The 200 V capacitors must have faced 350 Volts DC and "broke". Lucky that they did'nt explode.
yes the capacitors were 200 but it was produced like this from the factory ...
 

ebp

Joined Feb 8, 2018
2,332
If you powered it with 220 VAC when it was set for 110 V input you blew it up because you didn't read the documentation and the fault is 100% yours.
Expect other parts of the circuit to have been damaged.
 

Thread Starter

Sirol

Joined Nov 1, 2017
22
If you powered it with 220 VAC when it was set for 110 V input you blew it up because you didn't read the documentation and the fault is 100% yours.
Expect other parts of the circuit to have been damaged.
Yes, of course, but it was only a moment (4 s), then set it to 220V, and in any case the power supply continued to run after burning, I hope only the capacitors are blown out but in doubt how do I figure out if there is something of a fault?
 

Thread Starter

Sirol

Joined Nov 1, 2017
22
This diagram is shown what is going on in this type of a circuit.
View attachment 149386
Are any additional comments is needed?
so it is perfectly normal that the capacitors have burned, okay, one thing I would like to know, if the capacitors are burned they do not let more current flow through? and what's more it's better to check the jumper?
 

dendad

Joined Feb 20, 2016
3,564
I think you would be well served to find someone who has some electronic knowledge to repair it for you.
There is most likely more damage to the supply than just the capacitors.
Oh, I did the identical thing but on a power supply from a ship. I forgot the ship ran on 110V :(
Big Bang, Red Face!
 

Thread Starter

Sirol

Joined Nov 1, 2017
22
I think you would be well served to find someone who has some electronic knowledge to repair it for you.
There is most likely more damage to the supply than just the capacitors.
Oh, I did the identical thing but on a power supply from a ship. I forgot the ship ran on 110V :(
Big Bang, Red Face!
I'm really sorry, an experience to forget anyway I see what I can do thanks
 

dendad

Joined Feb 20, 2016
3,564
Be careful as you play with it. Remember the caps can hold power for quite a while. Always ensure it is turned off and unplugged before touching it.
Stay safe!
 
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