Can somebody help me make my Crossover singlesided print layout into a Gerber file ?

Thread Starter

oslosl

Joined Jan 13, 2023
173
The board is 4x1.8". Each block is 1/5" (2.54mm). Copper is red, components green. Seen from back, copper side. Solder dots and lanes should be as big as possible, naturally without overlapping. Copper should not go all the way out to the board sides/edge. Drill holes 1 mm, except the 2 mounting/center holes that should be 3 mm. The rest i.e. board thickness, etc. should just be cheapest standard.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Thread Starter

oslosl

Joined Jan 13, 2023
173
Last edited:

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
19,100
hi,
It looks a little daunting, but it is fairly easy for a PCB that simple.
What are the dimensions of the PCB in inches? And are allowing for any PCB fixing/mounting holes.?
E
I see 4" x1.8" :(
 

Thread Starter

oslosl

Joined Jan 13, 2023
173
hi,
It looks a little daunting, but it is fairly easy for a PCB that simple.
What are the dimensions of the PCB in inches? And are allowing for any PCB fixing/mounting holes.?
E
I see 4" x1.8" :(
Thanks. Board dimensions of PCB 4 x 1.8 inches. Mounting holes = 2 center holes.
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
19,100
Hi,
Checking the free Classic expressPCB version,
This is the maximum PCB size, sorry, not suitable for your PCB size.

These boards do not include solder mask or silkscreen. With a fixed size of 3.8” x 2.5” and quantity of 3, we are able to maximize our efficiency and pass the savings back to you.
 

Thread Starter

oslosl

Joined Jan 13, 2023
173
If it is 4" (101.6 mm) or 100 mm (3.94") long is not really important. Could probably reduce it to 3.8" by removing a little bit of space (2 mm) in each sides.
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

oslosl

Joined Jan 13, 2023
173
Designing and laying out a PCB using a CAD program is a learned skill.
Regardless of the learning curve you have to start somewhere. It gets easier the more you do it
Thanks. What turned me off a bit about KiCad was that I couldn't even figure out these basics:
1) How do I set that it's single sided print ?
2) How do I set PCB board size ?
3) How do I set a solder dot ?
4) How do I connect the dots ?
Maybe I am thinking the wrong way about PCB design ?
 
Last edited:

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
31,079
Thanks. What turned me off a bit about KiCad was that I couldn't even figure out these basics:
1) How do I set that it is single sided print ?
2) How do I set PCB board size ?
3) How do I set a solder dot ?
(1) You place all tracks on the bottom layer. When it comes time to make the PCB you use the bottom gerber file only.
(2) You keep all pads and tracks inside your board boundaries. There is a board layout line drawing tool to draw the board outline. You can do this on the overlay layer.
(3) If you mean a solder pad, you can place a solder pad anywhere you wish.

I am an Eagle user. I have never used KiCad.
 

panic mode

Joined Oct 10, 2011
2,871
Thanks. What turned me off a bit about KiCad was that I couldn't even figure out these basics:
1) How do I set that it's single sided print ?
2) How do I set PCB board size ?
3) How do I set a solder dot ?
4) How do I connect the dots ?
Maybe I am thinking the wrong way about PCB design ?
1. you do not... you design for 2-layer board. just make sure to keep the top side without tracks. in this case i have chosen to make jumper as a top layer track. this way if you order PCB, jumper will be manufactured by PCB shop as part of the board. if you are making PCB yourself, you can simply ignore that layer and place piece of wire yourself, and solder it in the same vias. they of course need to be sufficiently large in order to accept wire and handle current your circuit is supposed to handle. by default tracks and vias are tiny, meant for high density design so you need to adjust values in board design - net classes.
2. set grid to something reasonable such as 100mil. then choose layer board cuts and draw rectangle. as you draw, board size will be displayed. before this was shown so nicely, workaround was to hit space at the first corner (resets relative coordinates to zero) then drag until dX and dY values are what you need, then release button to complete rectangle...
3. you create custom footprint for new component. then place pads etc as you like and make each part suitable size. you can format each pad, specify properties like shape, drill hole size etc. once you have created each of footprints you need and save them into suitable library (i use my own called USER), then you can add them into your design - directly into PCB (in this case) or normally choose the footprint for schematic component of your liking.
4. crude way is to just click on track and draw. the proper (normal) way is to
a) create schematic
b) export it as Netlist (in newer versions this is automatic)
c) open PCB design tool and import Netlist and this will bring all footprints you associated earlier (while making schematic)
d) spread the footprints the way you like them to appear on the board, rotate as needed and change on which side of board they should appear on... there will be bunch of white thin lines that like rubber bands stretch from one pad to another. those are called "rats nest" and indicate what things still need to be connected.
e) setup board properties (number of layers, net classes etc.).
f) route board by connecting pads with tracks or zones. things that are recognized as connected will no longer show ratsnest lines. feel free to check 3D view and spot any problems or space conflicts.
g) export fabrication files (gerber, drill file). optionally add screenshot or two.
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

oslosl

Joined Jan 13, 2023
173
Hi,
Checking the free Classic expressPCB version,
This is the maximum PCB size, sorry, not suitable for your PCB size.

These boards do not include solder mask or silkscreen. With a fixed size of 3.8” x 2.5” and quantity of 3, we are able to maximize our efficiency and pass the savings back to you.
I can reduce it to 3.8" by removing a little bit of space (2 mm) in each side.
 
Last edited:

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
31,079
You don't "mirror" it.
You do the layout as viewed from the top (component side). The bottom layer will be mirrored automatically.
 

Thread Starter

oslosl

Joined Jan 13, 2023
173
You don't "mirror" it.
You do the layout as viewed from the top (component side). The bottom layer will be mirrored automatically.
Ok. Thanks. But the top component side should look like this and there is 2 solder pads missing.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Jon Chandler

Joined Jun 12, 2008
1,096
My recommendation would be to use EasyEDA, provided for free from JLCPCB. It's truly easy to use, and it makes it a one step process to order circuit boards from JLC.

If you have part numbers for all of the components, EasyEDA probably has all the footprints for those components.

EasyEDA likes to start with a schematic, but for this simple design, it's not strictly required. To skip the schematic, first put all the component footprints on the blank circuit board, then make all the connections between points using "air wires" – these are direct lines between connected points, not the circuit board tracks. Once this is done, you can route traces between connected points.

Two second history:
I started with Eagle (and used it for years), which is unlike any program you've used, and has a steep learning curve. I tried Kicad – couldn't make sense of it. Tried EasyEDA and found it easy to use without a huge learning curve.
 

panic mode

Joined Oct 10, 2011
2,871
that is correct. if you open attached Gerber files in suitable viewer and it will show you the board as viewed from top. PCB shop will take care of the rest. if you are making PCB yourself at home, you will need to mirror the bottom layer
 
Top