Attaching power cable to a electrical motor.

Thread Starter

Niels Witlox

Joined Nov 16, 2020
14
Hi there,

This is my first time on this forum. I hope I am in the right place because I need some knowledge that I don't have. But first, I'm Niels, I'm 18 years old and I'm from the Netherlands.

Now here is my problem:
I've got an old electromotor that I want to fix. The first step in that would be attaching a power cable to it since it does not have one. Now this might be the simplest thing to you, and I have done some electrical work too in the past, but I just can't figure this one out. It would really mean the word to me if someone could help me out. It doesn't have to be pretty, It just has to work.

These are some photos of where I think the power cables must be attached. and some sort of a descriptive image/chart.
IMG_20201116_230813.jpgIMG_20201116_230829.jpgIMG_20201116_230819.jpg

I hope someone could help me out here. Thanks in advance,

Niels Witlox
 

Delta Prime

Joined Nov 15, 2019
1,150
Hello there :) that's very nice very good information need a little more is this part of your motor if so can you take another photo please.
Or any specifications anywhere on your unit thank you
Oh yeah welcome to AAC sorry about that.

Polish_20201116_153211922.jpg
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,919
It would appear that the power connects to L1 (live) and N (Neutral). What is the motor from?
Be very cautious when you power it up. Bolt it down firmly and do not stand close to it. Be ready to switch it off immediately if anything suspicious occurs. It may run quite fast with no load.
Regards,
Keith
 

Thread Starter

Niels Witlox

Joined Nov 16, 2020
14
Hello there :) that's very nice very good information need a little more is this part of your motor if so can you take another photo please.
Or any specifications anywhere on your unit thank you
Oh yeah welcome to AAC sorry about that.
Hi Delta prime,

Thank you for your reply. Here is some additional information:

This part is indeed of my motor, it's the back protection plate that protects the cooling ventilator. This is what the plate on it says:
IMG_20201117_081907.jpg

I had to brake the plate off as you can see in the picture below. It is bent inwards, so it would have restricted the fan and motor from spinning. Do you think I can leave it off? because I hade to brake it off, so I cant properly attach it again.
IMG_20201117_081917.jpg

There is also an earth icon in seen on in the picture below, do you know how this works and how I could ground the unit?



And do you know what this component is for? and do you think I could control the speed of the motor?

Thank you so much in advance for your time and effort to help me!

Niels Witlox
 

Attachments

Thread Starter

Niels Witlox

Joined Nov 16, 2020
14
It would appear that the power connects to L1 (live) and N (Neutral). What is the motor from?
Be very cautious when you power it up. Bolt it down firmly and do not stand close to it. Be ready to switch it off immediately if anything suspicious occurs. It may run quite fast with no load.
Regards,
Keith
Hi KeithWalker,

Thank you for your kind reply! I have some knowledge of electricals. You are talking about the live and a neutral. Is the ''live'' the same as the phase (the brown cable)? And then I assume that de Neutral is blue, and then I also would like to earth the thing since I don't even know if its in a good condition to operate. Could you have a look at the photo's and prescriptions I wrote in my reply to Delta prime? Thank you so much!

Niels Witlox
 

Kjeldgaard

Joined Apr 7, 2016
453
The Netherlands appears to be 230 VAC / 50 Hz for single phase loads.

I have doubts about the motor rated 220 VAC / 60 Hz is a problem?

Both the higher voltage and the lower frequency result in a higher consumption of the motor.
 

Thread Starter

Niels Witlox

Joined Nov 16, 2020
14
The Netherlands appears to be 230 VAC / 50 Hz for single phase loads.

I have doubts about the motor rated 220 VAC / 60 Hz is a problem?

Both the higher voltage and the lower frequency result in a higher consumption of the motor.
Hi Kjeldgaard,

Thanks for your reply!

Ik don't know if that will be a problem. All I know is that it doesn't come from abourd the Netherlands. It might be old tho.

Niels
 

s14rs4

Joined Sep 15, 2016
73
I notice in the picture in post #2 that the fan appears to be cracked, also some of the blades are broken. This could be very dangerous, the fan could disintegrate at speed and cause serious injury. I would not attempt to run it.
 

Thread Starter

Niels Witlox

Joined Nov 16, 2020
14
I notice in the picture in post #2 that the fan appears to be cracked, also some of the blades are broken. This could be very dangerous, the fan could disintegrate at speed and cause serious injury. I would not attempt to run it.

Yes I noticed too, I'm not planning on running it with the fan in place. If the motor does work I do a replacement or another solution. What do you think of that?
 

s14rs4

Joined Sep 15, 2016
73
Yes I noticed too, I'm not planning on running it with the fan in place. If the motor does work I do a replacement or another solution. What do you think of that?
If you remove the fan then it should be safe but the motor will overheat if you load it to its maximum rating. As for the voltage and frequency ratings this motor looks to have been designed for the north american market, the CSA logo on the plate is the Canadian Standards Authority.

The manufacturer Emod Motoren in Germany has a website, you could try contacting them and ask their advice.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
9,304
The connection information posted is correct, and tha fan is broken and needs to be replaced befor the motor is put into use. The type of motor is TEFC, meaning totally enclosed Fan Cooled. So for normal operation it mus have fan cooling. Also, it is indeed a fairly powerful motor, so adequate sized wiring must be used. And the starting inrush current will be quite a bit. From the volts and amps it seems like it would be a one horsepower motor, So there would be quite a tendency to roll over when it is first started.
 

Thread Starter

Niels Witlox

Joined Nov 16, 2020
14
The connection information posted is correct, and tha fan is broken and needs to be replaced befor the motor is put into use. The type of motor is TEFC, meaning totally enclosed Fan Cooled. So for normal operation it mus have fan cooling. Also, it is indeed a fairly powerful motor, so adequate sized wiring must be used. And the starting inrush current will be quite a bit. From the volts and amps it seems like it would be a one horsepower motor, So there would be quite a tendency to roll over when it is first started.
Thanks for your advice on te cable. I am planning tot clamp the motor down to nu workbench, that will eliminate its tendancy to jump. Do you have any advice on the cooling probleem? I am nog sure I could Just buy a replacement, surtainly nog in the Netherlands. I also don'y want to spend much money on this old motor.
 

s14rs4

Joined Sep 15, 2016
73
Thanks for your advice on te cable. I am planning tot clamp the motor down to nu workbench, that will eliminate its tendancy to jump. Do you have any advice on the cooling probleem? I am nog sure I could Just buy a replacement, surtainly nog in the Netherlands. I also don'y want to spend much money on this old motor.
Many motors these days use a plastic fan, you may be able to find a replacement quite cheap. You will need the shaft diameter and the outer diameter of the fan. Motors are made in standard sizes I think the 90L in the type number is the frame size. You also need to attach the fan cover to direct the airflow over the motor.

As I said earlier, if you contact the manufacturers and quote the type number, they might be able to help.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,639
There is also an earth icon in seen on in the picture below, do you know how this works and how I could ground the unit?
You can use any point on the motor frame, normally there is a GND terminal in the terminal box itself (note the GND symbol), it almost looks like they cast one in there, but failed to drill and tap it??
Preferably one of the screws situated in or on the terminal cover.
Edit: There is a GND terminal fitted to the bottom LH side of the interior.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

Niels Witlox

Joined Nov 16, 2020
14
You can use any point on the motor frame, normally there is a GND terminal in the terminal box itself (note the GND symbol), it almost looks like they cast one in there, but failed to drill and tap it??
Preferably one of the screws situated in or on the terminal cover.
Max.
Thanks Max!
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
9,304
Aside from clamping the motor you should position it so that if the clamping fails it will not roll off the bench. In the shop I would put them on the floor for such a test, blocked so that they could not roll.

And as for the fan, the need for cooling depends on the run time. For low duty-cycle running of a minute or two you can get away without a cooling fan. I think that I saw a part of the fan housing, that is ver important for directing the air along the motor body.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,639
The motor has a TEFC rating, 'Totally Enclosed Fan-Cooled' motor is a typical industrial motor with an enclosure that is sealed so it requires an external fan in order to cool it.
Hence the body fins.
If the fan blades are damaged, it will also cause unbalancing of the motor.
Max.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
9,304
The motor has a TEFC rating, 'Totally Enclosed Fan-Cooled' motor is a typical industrial motor with an enclosure that is sealed so it requires an external fan in order to cool it.
Hence the body fins.
If the fan blades are damaged, it will also cause unbalancing of the motor.
Max.
Max, that has already been mentioned, also that the broken fan casting will fail at speed and so the TS is removing it for the test.
 
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