ASM vs. .asm vs. Assembly vs. Assembler

Thread Starter

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,401
Warning: This thread will be much ado about nothing. Proceed with caution.

When I refer to assembler code, I call it ".asm". Others call it "ASM".

In long form, some say "assembly" rather than "assembler" which I think is the proper long form. Which is correct?

"ASM" looks like an acronym to me. For those not in the know, they may run off looking for its definition. Granted, they may have no clue of ".asm" as well.

I like to use .asm because it directly indicates the file type that is used by pretty much all assemblers.

Thoughts welcome.
 

Thread Starter

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,401
As far as "assembly" vs. "assembler":

Assembler code is code written for an assembler in assembly language. No?
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
25,907
My take: The language is "assembly language" (of whatever flavor) and an "assembler" is what is used to convert "assembly code" to machine code. Using .asm as a shorthand for assembly language code seems reasonable to me. As for ASM, is there a particular assembler out there named ASM? I'm not sure, but I think there is. There are lots of assemblers such as MASM, TASM, and others that use ASM as a suffix, so it would not be unreasonable to use ASM (or perhaps *ASM just like you see *NIX for Unix/Linux, etc.) to refer to an assembler.

But at the end of the day we have to accept that all of these terms WILL be used for all of these different things and we have to strive to understand what is meant based on the context of use as opposed what we would ideally like them to mean.
 

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,012
Warning: This thread will be much ado about nothing. Proceed with caution.

When I refer to assembler code, I call it ".asm". Others call it "ASM".

In long form, some say "assembly" rather than "assembler" which I think is the proper long form. Which is correct?

"ASM" looks like an acronym to me. For those not in the know, they may run off looking for its definition. Granted, they may have no clue of ".asm" as well.

I like to use .asm because it directly indicates the file type that is used by pretty much all assemblers.

Thoughts welcome.
Although I am sure I do everything the correct way:p, this thread is clear evidence that we are running out of things to talk about.

 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,876
Back when I started using it it was used to write P.C. programs, it was not considered then that anyone would ever need any more than 1 meg of memory.
Hence the 640K.
Then we called it 'Assembly language'.
Max.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,876
I did a quick inventory list of Books out there that are available on the subject some have been around for decades and all the titles I found used 'Assembly' without exception.
Max.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
7,351
Agreed. But should the assembly language code be called "assembly code" or "assembler code" as in, "code for the assembler"?
Not very authoritative but this is what we were told.

The assembler takes blocks symbolic 'machine' code' and converts it into a usable format for the linker that makes an executable program that can run directly on native hardware. This machine code is normally called an Assembly of machine code instructions. So the program is build from parts with each part an Assembly of the whole as in the mechanical construction of a machine.
 

vpoko

Joined Jan 5, 2012
267
Agreed. But should the assembly language code be called "assembly code" or "assembler code" as in, "code for the assembler"?
I'd say it's "source code" written in "assembly language". It gets processed (assembled) by an assembler. This is similar to how one writes source code in the C language and compiles it with a compiler.
 

Thread Starter

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,401
I'd say it's "source code" written in "assembly language". It gets processed (assembled) by an assembler. This is similar to how one writes source code in the C language and compiles it with a compiler.
Agreed. Takes too long to type, though. I'll have to write a macro.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
25,907
The term ASM actually refers to a group of people that originated and, later, perpetuate and propagate assembly language programming.

ASM - Analists, Smartasses, and Masochists.

Anyone here qualify for membership based on any one of the pillars?

How many, besides myself, can go for the trifecta and qualify for all three pillars.
 
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