Ammeter connection

Thread Starter

Jonathan Foong

Joined Mar 13, 2021
27
A more important consideration is what effect it will have on the circuit. Ideal ammeters have no resistance, real meters do.
For the case of Ammeter with Shunt resistor, would it be a concern for any reason? I noticed some circuitry, the shunt resistor was the last one connected to the negative terminal of the DC supply source. Thanks.
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
604
It doesn't make a difference, just make sure you ALWAYS have a load in series with your ammeter (connected to the high side of the load OR the low side - it doesn't make a difference).

if you are talking about high voltage, industrial applications, there may be some best practices that I am not aware of when inserting an ammeter in a circuit.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
24,395
"Almost all" ammeters have a shunt resistor because you want the resistance of the meter to be as low as possible and practical, close to 0Ω. The shunt resistor could be embedded in the meter itself, for example, in handheld DMM.

For shock hazard protection one may prefer having the meter on the ground side of the power supply.
 

Thread Starter

Jonathan Foong

Joined Mar 13, 2021
27
"Almost all" ammeters have a shunt resistor because you want the resistance of the meter to be as low as possible and practical, close to 0Ω. The shunt resistor could be embedded in the meter itself, for example, in handheld DMM.

For shock hazard protection one may prefer having the meter on the ground side of the power supply.
Thank you very much for your reply. It helps me to understand a good reason to do so.
 
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