2Hz Oscillator Using CD4060

Thread Starter

maker_2023

Joined Nov 20, 2023
167
I had a "senior moment". I was measuring the signal off of pin14
rather than Q14 (pin 3). However, my scope shows a square wave
but the reading say "f < 10Hz" so I guess that the circuit is likely
putting out 2Hz but the scope maybe doesn't go that low. If that
makes any sense.

M
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
34,464
Unfortuantely, I don't know how to do that.
A digital oscilloscope likely has a period measurement option.
If not, just set the horizonal sweep to give at least one complete period of the waveform, and then look at how many horizontal divisions that is.
Then multiply the number of divisions by the horizontal sweep speed displayed on the screen, likely in ms (per division).

For example the Rigol scope below is showing an H (horizontal sweep speed) of 20.0µs per division.

1706725357750.png
 

Thread Starter

maker_2023

Joined Nov 20, 2023
167
A digital oscilloscope likely has a period measurement option.
If not, just set the horizonal sweep to give at least one complete period of the waveform, and then look at how many horizontal divisions that is.
Then multiply the number of divisions by the horizontal sweep speed displayed on the screen, likely in ms (per division).

For example the Rigol scope below is showing an H (horizontal sweep speed) of 20.0µs per division.

View attachment 314037
Thanks crutschow. I am learning how to use this new scope. Its been awhile since I was
involved in the hobby. There is a period measurement and it is 500ms.

One last question. Shouldn't the output of the CD4060BE drive a single LED?
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
34,464
Shouldn't the output of the CD4060BE drive a single LED?
Depending upon the supply voltage, generally only at low current.
An excerpt below from the data sheet (gasp) shows the available current below:

If you want more LED current, then you can add a transistor buffer.

1706730131438.png
1706730038252.png
 
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