Wiring for old Emerson 3/4 hp motor?

Thread Starter

NoEdison

Joined Feb 18, 2017
12
this is a longshot
I have an old Emerson 3/4 hp motor model KS60CX and would like to wire it up to 110V.
Oddly there is no evidence of previous wiring, and it looks like there is an unused port where electric usually is.
Is there likely a somewhat generic way to wire it up? I guess I will open up the panel and see if there is any wiring in there so I have something to work with.

Thank you!
 

Thread Starter

NoEdison

Joined Feb 18, 2017
12
took a few things apart and found some more info:
internal wiring and diagram (see pics)

looks similar to other schematics I have seen on the Net, so may figure it out, but would certainly welcome any informed suggestionsIMG_0826 smaller.JPG IMG_0827 smaller.JPG IMG_0829 smaller.JPG IMG_0833 smaller.JPG IMG_0827 electric.JPG
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,224
Voltages labeled: 115, 230
Labeled drawings: Low voltage, high voltage
Low voltage: Line on 1 and 4
Brown to 3
Black to 2
White to 4
Red to 5

You are going to have to get in there with a magnifying glass and find the numbering on the connection board.
 

Thread Starter

NoEdison

Joined Feb 18, 2017
12
Voltages labeled: 115, 230
Labeled drawings: Low voltage, high voltage
Low voltage: Line on 1 and 4
Brown to 3
Black to 2
White to 4
Red to 5

You are going to have to get in there with a magnifying glass and find the numbering on the connection board.
thanks!
I was hoping to just hook it up to an AC cord, hot and neutral 110, and just run it with a pulley on it. Is that possible?

does the low and high voltage connection refer to 110 vs. 220?
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,224
You are missing the obvious. It's built for what you call 110 volts which consists of, "hot" and "neutral".
The low and high voltage are on the label: 115V/230V
You probably call them 110 and 220.
 

Thread Starter

NoEdison

Joined Feb 18, 2017
12
I got the motor working; it was mis-wired somewhere along the way; seemed to be half-way between 115 and 230.

I followed the diagram for "low voltage," hooked up 110 to the Line poles, clamped it to the bench and plugged it into a remote switch (power strip).
 
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