Wiring a Parallel Control Circuit for an Electric Door Lock with Multiple 12V Inputs

Thread Starter

karimchedid

Joined Feb 27, 2024
6
I am currently working on an upgrade to my door security system and I'm seeking advice on how to properly wire a circuit with multiple control points. The system involves an electric door lock that operates on a 12V input. Here's the setup:

  1. The primary control is a Wi-Fi-enabled doorbell that, when activated, sends a 12V signal to unlock the door.
  2. I wish to integrate an additional manual exit button that, when pressed, also sends a 12V signal to the same electric lock to allow exit from inside without interacting with the Wi-Fi doorbell system. i can use another 12v adapter or 12v battery
The goal is to have either control (the Wi-Fi doorbell or the manual exit button) capable of triggering the lock mechanism. I understand that both controls should be wired in a manner that is analogous to an "OR" logic gate, where the activation of either switch would complete the circuit and trigger the lock.

My questions for the community are:

  • What is the correct term for this type of circuit configuration with multiple inputs controlling a single load?
  • Can someone provide guidance or a schematic on how to wire two 12V inputs in parallel to control one electric door lock?
  • Are there any specific considerations or components I should include to protect the circuit from potential backfeed or voltage spikes?
Any advice on the circuit design or components would be greatly appreciated, especially if there are best practices for ensuring the reliability and safety of the system.

Thank you in advance for your expertise!
 

Thread Starter

karimchedid

Joined Feb 27, 2024
6
honestly its an old door lock yale i couldn't find its datasheet online , its working now connected to a 12v battery with 2 switches i wanted to integrate with a wifi door bell which has an output 12vdc , the only info i could take from the lock is 15w - 12v
 

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MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,534
Welcome to AAC. Now I understand the issue, which is that the WiFi doorbell is not providing a contact closure, but rather a DC voltage output. If it is possible to connect to the wifi device to just have a contact closure, then it would be very simple to just connect the two switches in parallel.
One concern may be the current draw by the door lock mechanism, which at 15 watts will be drawing about 1 1/4 amps. So before going farther I suggest investigating what the maximum current output rating of the wifi doorbell is. That may require an alternate plan if the limit is not adequate for the application.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
8,989
If you use a relay, you can put its contacts in parallel with the other switches. How much current can the WIFI trigger supply? If it is less than 1.25A, you will need a relay.
 

Thread Starter

karimchedid

Joined Feb 27, 2024
6
If you use a relay, you can put its contacts in parallel with the other switches. How much current can the WIFI trigger supply? If it is less than 1.25A, you will need a relay.
THanks for the information , i will check the current i believe its 2.0 A as its on the datasheet , I will Test it for sure , thanks again
 

Thread Starter

karimchedid

Joined Feb 27, 2024
6
Welcome to AAC. Now I understand the issue, which is that the WiFi doorbell is not providing a contact closure, but rather a DC voltage output. If it is possible to connect to the wifi device to just have a contact closure, then it would be very simple to just connect the two switches in parallel.
One concern may be the current draw by the door lock mechanism, which at 15 watts will be drawing about 1 1/4 amps. So before going farther I suggest investigating what the maximum current output rating of the wifi doorbell is. That may require an alternate plan if the limit is not adequate for the application.
Thanks for the information indeed i will check the current before
thanks again
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,534
The post, #9, from BOB is totally correct, and just what I recommend, as well. But BOB said it first. An added benefit is that it will allow simpler wiring, at least I think it will, and probably less expensive wiring as well, because the pair from the wifi device to the relay will not need to carry more than the relay coil current, which will not be very much.
 
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