Where to start with Microcontroller Chips for PCB

Thread Starter

jlawley1969

Joined Feb 22, 2021
16
First off I have experience with arduino and considered using an ATmega chip in my design but it was just such over kill for what I am trying to do.

What I am trying to do,
Create 2 PWM signals(with varying duty cycle) to input to an IR2110 which will in turn drive some MOSFETs to make a modified "sine" wave inverter. I wrote the code needed to do what I want with the Arduino IDE and its like 25 lines of code.

So what I am looking for is a microcontroller that is bare bones and hopefully easy to code for. I have literally 0 experience with microcontroller IC aside from the arduino so I really have no idea what to look for in a chip or where to start.
I also dont know anything about processing power like if 16bit 4kb would be enough for my needs. I am trying to have as small a footprint as possible
thanks
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,778
First off I have experience with arduino and considered using an ATmega chip in my design but it was just such over kill for what I am trying to do.
I use the ATmega 328 chip for most small u-controller applications even if it is overkill. It is inexpensive (<$3.00 CAD from Aliexpress), well documented and easy to program. For example, I used one to simply measure and display the output frequency and amplitude of an audio oscillator that I designed.
Check out the ATtiny:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATtiny_microcontroller_comparison_char
They are physically much smaller than the ATmega and have less analog and data pins. They are available as an 8-pin DIP. They may be what you are looking for. I tried a couple when they first became available but had problems with attempting to program them. Maybe there is more reliable information available now.
 
Last edited:

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
23,515
The original Arduino platform is based on the Atmel ATmega328p chip.

1620228540321.png

You can still use the Arduino board to program an ATmega328p in the socket then transfer the chip to your own PCB project.
 
Top