what type of switch button is this

Thread Starter

Dadu@

Joined Feb 4, 2022
136
I found the switch button i don't understand how it works. I have attached images. I didn't see anything like the model number on it. I have searched a lot on internet but i can't find any information

Can anyone help me to understand what type of button is this and how it works ?
 

Attachments

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
25,469
Simple, take a reading across the contacts when pushing the button, if transparent button, it may have an illumination option, i.e. two connections
for light.
 

sparky 1

Joined Nov 3, 2018
718
It is either waiting or sleeping but it validates your entry indicating that you did press the button.
Unlike the dog animation the button simply lights led until an event happens but we have subconsciously replaced that validation because buttons are smart but they sure are slow and after much use you will begin to believe the dog is in charge.

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A 4 pin momentary button with configurable led light. A continuity can be found on 2 pins when pressed.
As an example you may be familiar with requesting an elevator. The old mechanical latching button may be difficult to implement on an elevator.
It is preferable to have an external latching mechanism either solid state or relay. The momentary button when lit informs the user that the request was made so the user will need to wait for the elevator. The connections on the back of the button for an elevator might be configured so the led turns on when the button is pushed. A different configuration like my printer, the led is always on however, if the printer is asleep I see a faint green glow that fades in and out some call breathing but is thankfully not snoring. In most cases the momentary pushbutton is part of a latching circuit.
 
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Thread Starter

Dadu@

Joined Feb 4, 2022
136
The four terminals of the switch have plus and minus signs on two terminals while nothing is written on two terminals.
When I connect those two terminals with the multimeter and press the switch, the buzzer of the multimeter starts ringing, and , when I release the button, the buzzer goes off.

Where should the + and - terminals be connected?
 

tepalia02

Joined May 13, 2022
37
The four terminals of the switch have plus and minus signs on two terminals while nothing is written on two terminals.
When I connect those two terminals with the multimeter and press the switch, the buzzer of the multimeter starts ringing, and , when I release the button, the buzzer goes off.

Where should the + and - terminals be connected?
It does not matter. You can connect any terminal of the switch to + or -. You only have to figure out which pins become shorted when you press the switch. And you have already figured that out.
 

Thread Starter

Dadu@

Joined Feb 4, 2022
136
Yes, and it will probably need a series resistor, value depending on the supply voltage.
I have two wires for the 12V DC power supply and four terminal of the push button.

How to connect 12v DC supply with this type of push button? I do not understand the connection of LED plus mines, where to connect.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
5,227
I have two wires for the 12V DC power supply and four terminal of the push button.

How to connect 12v DC supply with this type of push button? I do not understand the connection of LED plus mines, where to connect.
Try connecting your 12V supply though a 1K resistor to the + and - and see what happens.

Bob
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,881
The posts on the switch marked with the + & - are the connections to the illumination LED. We don't know if the switch has an internal resistor so I didn't draw one. The + is where you connect the positive lead to and the minus is where the negative is connected to. THIS IS IMPORTANT! If the LED does not have an internal resistor and you connect it to power you will blow it out faster than you can think.

The other two connections are the switch contact connections. It doesn't matter which way around you connect to them, they're just a make or break connection. To know better how to wire it we can answer if we know the way you intend to use it. The model number of the switch would help too.

Notice that in my drawing the LED is independent of the switch (the push button symbol in the middle that looks like a sideways hat.
1654095424938.png
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,881
Try connecting your 12V supply though a 1K resistor to the + and - and see what happens.
The plus OR the minus. Not across.

What Bob likely intended to say was connect a 1KΩ resistor to one of the two leads and connect 12 volts to one lead of the switch (diode) and the other to the battery. Be sure to get the polarity right. Getting that backwards can have bad results. IF you put the resistor on the positive lead (that's fine if you do) then you connect 12 volts POSITIVE to the other end of the resistor. You then connect the negative 12 volts to the LED NEGATIVE terminal on the switch. The LED will light up. It may be normal brightness or may be dim. IF dim, try a 470Ω resistor. Should be brighter. WARNING! GOING TOO LOW ON RESISTANCE MAY BURN OUT THE LED. If the brightness appears to be normal with the 1KΩ resistor then it is a safe bet there is no internal resistor. If the LED brightness is very dim then chances are there's an internal resistor and the switch was designed with the intention of being used on a 12 volt system.
 

Thread Starter

Dadu@

Joined Feb 4, 2022
136
Try connecting your 12V supply though a 1K resistor to the + and - and see what happens.

Bob
This button is made of stainless steel which is the conductor so I'm a little worried.

Can you give some tips when doing this experiment. How not to hold this button, it may result in electric shock
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,881
We need to know how you want to use this button. Until we understand your application we can't be specific. So far we've given some examples but we've assumed a few things. At least I have. Bob suggests a 1KΩ resistor in series with the LED (+ & - terminals), which is an excellent suggestion for understanding more about the makeup of the LED. If you have a meter you can measure the voltage across the LED (not the series resistor) and see what that is. If there's an internal resistor you'll get somewhere around 5 to 8 volts if it has an internal resistor. Otherwise you'll be reading the voltage drop across the LED alone, which is highly useful information. But until we fully understand the intended use we can't be more specific.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,881
Just to clear up something that might be confusing. I know I got confused. Happens all the time. Here's what Bob suggested:
1654097204975.png
 

BobaMosfet

Joined Jul 1, 2009
1,996
I found the switch button i don't understand how it works. I have attached images. I didn't see anything like the model number on it. I have searched a lot on internet but i can't find any information

Can anyone help me to understand what type of button is this and how it works ?
That is a push-button led ring switch. Look up 'push button ring switch' on google
 

ThePanMan

Joined Mar 13, 2020
430
The on-board light normally requires 12VDC and no resistor.
If it has an internal resistor. Does it?

Try this: Get a CR2032 coin battery and connect it to the LED. If there's an internal resistor then the LED might light but very dimly. If there's no internal resistor then it will be fairly bright. And you don't have to worry about blowing out the LED using a CR2032 battery. It's just not capable of much current. If it's bright then it doesn't have an internal resistor, and one will be needed according to the Vf and the source of DC power going to the LED. You mentioned 12 volts. If so - 1K ohm is likely the proper resistor.

I agree with others - how are you going to use this switch?

This button is made of stainless steel which is the conductor so I'm a little worried.
There is nothing to worry about. The internal components are isolated from the metal body of the switch. If you're that worried about it then take a meter and test for continuity between the metal body and each lead one by one. You're looking for less than 3 ohms. Less than 3 ohms and you have a case that is connected to one or more pins. If you're using it strictly on low voltages (≤ 60 volts) you don't have anything to worry about. Low voltage is either 60 or less - OR 50 volts or less. Not 100% sure which. But if you're using it on 12 volts - there's nothing to worry about.
 
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