What should i learn next, based on these things which i know so far?

Thread Starter

KINDOFABEGINNER

Joined Oct 20, 2019
9
Since you can light an LED, the next step would be to use a transistor as a switch to the LED on and off with a an applied voltage. In doing so, pay attention to which side of the transistor the LED and resistor are connected to, and why. Beginners usually get that wrong. Also make sure that you understand why the base of the transistor cannot be connected directly to a voltage source.

Once you understand that, see how you can add a capacitor to make the LED fade on or off. That will introduce you to the linear region of transistor operation.

Then a multivibrator will be within reach pf your understanding. It can flash two LEDs alternately.

Next, learn how you can use a transistor to amplify an audio signal.

You can learn about Zener diodes by making a simple voltage regulator.

Then learn how you can add a transistor to your simple regulator to give it the capability for higher current and better regulation.

This should keep you busy for a while!

Bob

Bob
I LOVE YOUR POST:D
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
17,135
Where should i go now?
Pick some project within your capabilities, such as a blinking LED using a discrete oscillator, a 555 timer, or a CMOS Schmitt inverter (CD40106, CD4093). Study the circuit until you understand what every component is doing. Then try to predict what would happen if you modified the circuit.

Try more difficult projects as you gain experience.

Learn to read datasheets so you can design circuits that don't destroy parts. Some beginner books encourage people to learn by destroying things; I don't think that's necessary. It will happen, but there's no point in doing it on purpose.

If you wire a circuit and it doesn't work, use that as an opportunity to really understand how the circuit works by troubleshooting. Don't give up until you understand how to make it work.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
17,135
i have a LM324SN IC. I've search the pinout but i don't know how to actually use it.
LM324, and it's dual counterpart LM358, are my go to opamps for non-demanding circuits. Read the datasheet to understand it's limitations (input/output voltages, maximum current, etc).

Try some of the examples in the datasheet.
 

Attachments

narkeleptk

Joined Mar 11, 2019
561
I've search the pinout but i don't know how to actually use it.:D
Check the datasheet for it. If your not sure what datasheet means or the examles then search google to see what it is or how it works. Don't need to read books but you do need to read quite a bit of snippets here and there.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
9,275
Opamps like the LM324 would be a good next step after the things I suggested. If you can find beauty in circuits, the opamp is a paragon.

First learn what they do and the uses they have. Then learn the basics of how they are implemented.

Bob
 

TeeKay6

Joined Apr 20, 2019
573
I like reading a good book, but i've tried many of them like "the art of electronics", or some of the books written by "forrest mims". They are a bit too much for a beginner. As someone who used to scroll instagram with no words but only pictures, It's not easy to read such books. But isn't it like if i build a frequency divider, i will learn about capacitors and resistors and circuits that are made of them?:)
Eric i have a LM324SN IC. I've search the pinout but i don't know how to actually use it.:D
@KINDOFABEGINNER
Learning to use an opamp to build a simple amplifier would be a good start. There are many, many articles on the Web and AAC if you search for "opamp", "how to use opamp", "simple opamp circuits", etc. At the same time your time would be very well spent if you studied the datasheet for the LM324, learning what each spec means...learning that alone would put you far ahead of most beginners.
 

atferrari

Joined Jan 6, 2004
4,798
There are circuits which with minor variations do show up along time, again and again so being familiar with them helps a lot. The good part is that you could implement most of them in little time to learn how they work; building blocks covering a wide range.

Search and you will find many. An example here
 
Last edited:

atferrari

Joined Jan 6, 2004
4,798
@KINDOFABEGINNER
Learning to use an opamp to build a simple amplifier would be a good start. There are many, many articles on the Web and AAC if you search for "opamp", "how to use opamp", "simple opamp circuits", etc. At the same time your time would be very well spent if you studied the datasheet for the LM324, learning what each spec means...learning that alone would put you far ahead of most beginners.
While you are at it, keep handy (I do) this little but powerful cheat sheet (prepared / posted long time ago by member Audioguru).
Once you manage to understand it you will be even more far ahead.

Polarizing op amps with single & dual supplies.gif
 
Top