What is difference between Central processing and Machine language instructions? Detailed plz

Thread Starter

Rb Shankar

Joined Jul 6, 2018
1
I have some idea about it but i want clear imagination about central processing instruction and machine language instructions.

points what i want to raise -

1. are both same.?
2. if not , then what is the difference in details.

thanks in advance .
 

Ian Rogers

Joined Dec 12, 2012
810
IMHO..... CPU works with binary direct... I'm assuming by "Machine language" you are referencing Assembly language!

Assembly converts "Mnemonic" machine code into binary instructions...

eg..

"BSF STATUS, 5" is Mnemonic and this is "0x1683 " Pic processor instruction ( core specific, this one is pic14 )
 
Last edited:

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
22,069
I have some idea about it but i want clear imagination about central processing instruction and machine language instructions.

points what i want to raise -

1. are both same.?
2. if not , then what is the difference in details.

thanks in advance .
Welcome to AAC!

The CPU is the heart of any computer system. The CPU operates on instructions that are always binary, i.e. zeros and ones.
The zeros and ones can be interpreted by humans in many different ways, whichever is most convenient and easier to visualize, remember, and manipulate.

Your answer is 1) CPU instruction and machine instruction are the same.
 

BR-549

Joined Sep 22, 2013
4,938
In my opinion, machine language is a list of binary patterns. This is what the hardware works with. The patterns have both instructions and data. The position or time of the pattern in the list....can have different meanings too.

Assembly is a descriptive hex shorthand of those patterns. All higher languages are just conditional/arranged assembly sub-routines.

For your question.....a processing language instruction would be any higher level language, than the binary pattern that the hardware uses.

But I might have mis-understood your question.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
22,069
There are other possible answers.

Some CPU architectures are implemented using micro-code.
Also, you can implement various interpreted languages using p-code or a java engine. Hence the processor does not necessarily have to translate a program into native machine code.

Anyhow, text messages and program code are still inherently binary.
 
Top