Want to buy a Linux based laptop/computer for programming

Thread Starter

Hunter Neumann

Joined Aug 24, 2015
53
Any suggestions? I already have a macbook pro but I want to buy a Linux laptop/TABLET** not desktop for my programming classes starting in the spring. I have seen a Python S2 tablet from ekoore that looks promising, but have not found one for sale. Id like to spend under 400$. I want one because Linux is open source and I think I should get familiar with the OS.
 

bertus

Joined Apr 5, 2008
20,102
Hello,

Best look for an outdated laptop, as linux will likely not have the drivers for the newest types.
The following pages will give you a lot of information on the compatibility of linux for the hardware:
http://www.linuxcompatible.org/
http://www.linux-laptop.net/

Depending on what you want, you could have a look at the following distros:
If you want to build the linux from scratch : https://www.gentoo.org/
If you want a free red-hat based linux : https://www.centos.org/
If you want a simple small linux : https://www.linuxliteos.com/
If you want a full featured linux : https://www.opensuse.org/

Bertus
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,268
Any suggestions? I already have a macbook pro but I want to buy a Linux laptop/TABLET** not desktop for my programming classes starting in the spring. I have seen a Python S2 tablet from ekoore that looks promising, but have not found one for sale. Id like to spend under 400$. I want one because Linux is open source and I think I should get familiar with the OS.
Excellent idea!

Now, here's the hard part: just about any Linux based laptop is going to be the same, or more, expensive than one with Windows. Why? Because the Windows computers ship with crapware that the publishers pay to have installed on the computers during manufacturing, thus lowering the overall cost to the manufacturer.

Luckily, Linux will run on just about any contemporary hardware you can buy. So, get a decent Windows laptop within your price range (yes, you will be paying a Redmond tax), and install Linux as a dual boot (I use Ubuntu -- though there are lots of choices). Then, you'll have the best of both worlds at a lower overall cost to you.
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,268
...as linux will likely not have the drivers for the newest types.
This is mostly not true anymore. But it always pays to check compatibility *if* the manufacturer is willing to publish enough detail about the underlying hardware.

One could always test with a Live USB and return the lappy if it don't work.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,487
This is mostly not true anymore. But it always pays to check compatibility *if* the manufacturer is willing to publish enough detail about the underlying hardware.

One could always test with a Live USB and return the lappy if it don't work.
For a programming machine just about any Intel (they open sourced the drivers to sell hardware) chipset laptop will work. You won't have super-speed graphics for games but that's not what the machine is for.
 

Thread Starter

Hunter Neumann

Joined Aug 24, 2015
53
Excellent idea!

Now, here's the hard part: just about any Linux based laptop is going to be the same, or more, expensive than one with Windows. Why? Because the Windows computers ship with crapware that the publishers pay to have installed on the computers during manufacturing, thus lowering the overall cost to the manufacturer.

Luckily, Linux will run on just about any contemporary hardware you can buy. So, get a decent Windows laptop within your price range (yes, you will be paying a Redmond tax), and install Linux as a dual boot (I use Ubuntu -- though there are lots of choices). Then, you'll have the best of both worlds at a lower overall cost to you.
any suggestion on a laptop that would run it well?
 
Last edited:

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,114
I think it is very likely, although not simple and easy. The details will depend on your particular machine and on what methods you can find to follow. It certainly has been done.
 

Thread Starter

Hunter Neumann

Joined Aug 24, 2015
53
I think it is very likely, although not simple and easy. The details will depend on your particular machine and on what methods you can find to follow. It certainly has been done.
do you think it is worth spending money to learn on a linux based system? or should I just learn on osx?
 

Thread Starter

Hunter Neumann

Joined Aug 24, 2015
53
This is mostly not true anymore. But it always pays to check compatibility *if* the manufacturer is willing to publish enough detail about the underlying hardware.

One could always test with a Live USB and return the lappy if it don't work.
do you think it is worth spending money to learn on a linux based system? or should I just learn on osx?
http://www.amazon.com/Asus-VivoBook-X200CA-DB02-11-6-Notebook/dp/B00CPIF63G/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1448048403&sr=8-2&keywords=ubuntu+laptop
 

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,012

mcgyvr

Joined Oct 15, 2009
5,394
You didn't state what type of programming you are doing..
And you can write programs on any computer/OS.. No reason you must have linux.. Even more so if you can't afford to spend money.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,114
... for my programming classes starting in the spring.
The tools you need are likely recommended in the course descriptions. You will likely be using some specific language(s) and you'll need to run specific applications to be in synch with the class. Figure out what you need to run those applications. Sometimes there are several ways to skin the cat but usually in a school situation you want to go with the herd, or you risk having to develop workarounds at critical times when you are under stress to get a project done. Not cool.
 
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