Victrola Vinyl Record Player

Thread Starter

wrobinson212

Joined Dec 3, 2018
8
Hi All.

Last Christmas (2017) I recieved a Victrola vinyl record player as a gift. For the price, it was an alright device -- although, I have seen better put together vinyl players for less.

Today, after quite some time without using it, I decided I was going to play an old Marvin Gaye song while in the shower.

I couldn't find the original cord so I used an identical one (SPPS 100V-240V Input 0.5A) to plug it in. Nothing was turning on -- no power at all. I switched adapters and outlets and still nothing.

I took it into our electronics lab and tried to read it with a multimeter. With everything plugged in and on I still could get no reading whatsoever. As of now, I have no pictures of the circuitry, however all of the connections look in tact.

What gives? Without any pictures of the circuits I realize it may he hard to give a diagnosis of the problem. The device was made in China. And I guess what I'm wondering is, do circuits generally degrade with time or become corroded? Dust particles interfering maybe?

Second question: I also wonder if I fried the circuitry initally today by plugging in that adapter that did not come with the device? I saw no smoke, and don't think I smelled anything burning.

I have contacted the business in order to hopefully get something resolved, or atleast a little more information. However, without a reciept, my chances of resolving this issue look slim. Note, this device is prone to issues. Maybe not electronical issues, but altogether it seems like the product could have been stronger.

I have attached adapters used. Starting with efest and ending with the adapter that came with the vinyl player (switching power supply model no. GKYPS0 etc.)
20181203_164234.jpg

20181203_164248.jpg

Moderators note : removed double images
 

Attachments

bertus

Joined Apr 5, 2008
20,534
Hello,

The power supply should be 5 Volts ans at least 1 Ampere.
The 12 Volts powersupplies you are showing, will likely break the player, due to over voltage.

Bertus
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
2,638
I agree with bertus. I don't see how the power supply that you tried could be considered identical with the original when it's output voltage is more than twice as much. If you are really lucky the connector on the wrong power supplies may be 2.5 mm centre pin and the connector in the unit a 2.1 mm centre pin.If that is the case then the centre pin may not have connected so it may not have destroyed the device. I suggest that you try it with the CORRECT power adapter.

Les.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
6,033
Quite probably too late to use the right one. 12 volts into a 5 volt input will usually do a bit of harm. The only thing worse is those evil nasty companies that go for CENTER NEGATIVE on the power connectors.
Just because the connector fits does not make a wall wart even close. HP often uses 24 and even 35 volts on their stuff.
So for those who do not read the label, the result is often damage and destruction.
 

Thread Starter

wrobinson212

Joined Dec 3, 2018
8
Well, that makes a lot of sense. Thanks guys... as you can tell, I am just now getting into circuits. I know that was probably a dumb question, haha.

Can someone please differentiate input voltage and output voltage?

In my mind, as if the input voltage would be flipped -- meaning that because you are plugging in the adapter (wall to device) than there would be 5 volts (input)? I see that that is not the case.
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
2,638
The input is where power comes into the device. The output is where power comes out of the device. So from the power supply's point of view IT'S input is FROM the power socket on the wall which will be 120 or 240 volts AC at 50 or 60 hz (Depending which country you are in.) IT'S output (For the correct power supply for you record player.) will be 5 volts DC and it will be capable of supplying at least 1 amp. (It does not matter if it can supply more than 1 amp. BUT THE VOLTAGE MUST BE CORRECT.) From the record player's point of view It's input is the coaxial power socket. The polarity of the power to the connector on the end of the wire from the power supply MUST be the same as the socket on the record player. (In this case the centre pin is positive.)

Les.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
6,033
Only transformers are "bi-lateral", meaning that they work in both directions. And even transformers have some limitations in that area. Power out is not as much as power in, the rest is lost as heat, no matter which way they go.

There are a few very slick designers creating some bi-lateral power supply devices but those are very rare and not available on the market yet.
And all of the things yhat Les mentioned are correct, Les said them very well.
 
Top