Uses for a no current lose step up transformer

Thread Starter

Drmario5237

Joined Oct 14, 2018
65
Hello. I was wondering if there is a type of step up transformer that increases voltage but doesn't decrease current at the same time. If there is what is it's name and even if there isn't one would there be any uses for a transformer that could do this and if so what are they. Thanks.
 

mvas

Joined Jun 19, 2017
538
Hello. I was wondering if there is a type of step up transformer that increases voltage but doesn't decrease current at the same time. If there is what is it's name and even if there isn't one would there be any uses for a transformer that could do this and if so what are they. Thanks.
They are called Over-Unity Devices, which are not allowed by our Laws of Physics.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,963
I have one, BUT it it's markings are confusing. It is an illuminated glow-tube "transformer" power supply, and the label states that the input is 120 volts at 1 amp, while the output is 10,000 volts at 20 Milliamps. This implies that 120 watts input provides 200,000 milliwatts output = 200 Watts output. But I am inclined to not believe the markings. My point being that not all labeling is accurate.
If there were such a thing as a device with 100% efficiency the volts x amps input could equal the volts x amps output, based on transformer theory. Unfortunately the only place such perfection can be found is in the Kingdom of Utopia, and nothing as solid as functional hardware of any kind can be exported from there. Ideas and concepts are routinely sent out, but that is the extent of that Kingdom's exports.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
3,627
Hello. I was wondering if there is a type of step up transformer that increases voltage but doesn't decrease current at the same time. If there is what is it's name and even if there isn't one would there be any uses for a transformer that could do this and if so what are they. Thanks.
I'll tell you what I know. First, we're going to talk hypothetically; meaning I'm going to ignore real world losses due to material imperfections.

Now, you're asking about maintaining a constant current. Let's assume you mean 1 amp in at a given voltage and 1 amp out at a different higher voltage. The key is "Power"; a.k.a. Wattage. Ignoring losses, a transformer may take in 10 watts and will put out 10 watts. Again, this is ignoring real world losses. Power (watts) is calculated by multiplying voltage times amperage. Assuming you have 10 volts AC going into a transformer with 1 amp you have 10 watts. When you change the voltage to a higher level your current goes down accordingly. So, 10 volts in at 1 amp, 100 volts out at 0.1 amp. 10 x 1 = 10. 100 x 0.1 = 10. If you go the other way, say you drop the voltage from 10 volts in to 1 volt out (numbers are hypothetical but the way they work are physics), at 1 volt out you'll get 10 amps. All things must balance. This is a part of ohms law. That's why you can't get more "Power" out of something than you put into it. People who "Claim" to have done it are charlatans. Liars. Cheats. Those YouTube videos are hoaxes. There are tricks you don't see. They do it so they can sucker people into viewing their channels. They depend on advertisements for an income, and the more you click on their videos the more money they make. There's no science to what they do, it's all lies and trickery. Because of this AAC has instituted a rule saying discussions of "Over Unity" (OU) devices are prohibited. AAC values their website and the reliable information that can come from it. Moderators will lock and remove discussions revolving around OU.

Take our advice, don't continue to pursue this course, it's going to be a waste of your time and probably money as well.

I told you I would share what I know. I don't know everything, so maybe there is something out there that will convert 10 volts 1 amp into 20 volts 1 amp. But it's not going to be a transformer alone. It MUST involve other components. Even then, in the end, all the extra stuff is going to consume power, so your net input will be higher but your net output will never exceed what you put in.

I mentioned real world losses. Copper wire is not a perfect conductor. Transformer's iron cores are not perfect magnetic conduits. Even powder form (wrong term I'm sure) cores (toroids made from iron powder) can not give you more power out than power in. They also have losses. If you have an electronic circuit and it produces even the slightest amount of heat - that heat is part of the losses. Heat is energy. And when you generate heat you're taking power away from something else.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
3,627
Those "Weller Soldering Guns" work on that principal. They commonly have 120 VAC going into a giant transformer with what is often a single winding output, meaning they turn 120 VAC into 0.01 volts. At that low voltage (and again, I'm using hypothetical numbers) you get extremely high current. That high current can heat up the tip of the soldering gun to the point where you can melt solder. If a gun is 600 watts in then that's (600÷120=) 5 amps. Watts divided by volts equals current. Using that same figure, 600 watts divided by 0.01 = 60,000 amps. Keep in mind, I'm making up numbers off the cuff. 60KA seems like a lot. But remember, there ARE losses. And I'm sure the numbers I've chosen for this example are probably WAY OFF from an actual soldering gun. The point is that you can't get more power out than you put in.
 

OBW0549

Joined Mar 2, 2015
3,011
I was wondering if there is a type of step up transformer that increases voltage but doesn't decrease current at the same time.
You may as well stop wondering: there is no such device.

If there is what is it's name and even if there isn't one would there be any uses for a transformer that could do this and if so what are they.
If there were such a thing it would be tantamount to a perpetual motion machine-- a physical impossibility. Learn some basic physics and you'll understand why.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,963
I'll tell you what I know. First, we're going to talk hypothetically; meaning I'm going to ignore real world losses due to material imperfections.

Now, you're asking about maintaining a constant current. Let's assume you mean 1 amp in at a given voltage and 1 amp out at a different higher voltage. The key is "Power"; a.k.a. Wattage. Ignoring losses, a transformer may take in 10 watts and will put out 10 watts. Again, this is ignoring real world losses. Power (watts) is calculated by multiplying voltage times amperage. Assuming you have 10 volts AC going into a transformer with 1 amp you have 10 watts. When you change the voltage to a higher level your current goes down accordingly. So, 10 volts in at 1 amp, 100 volts out at 0.1 amp. 10 x 1 = 10. 100 x 0.1 = 10. If you go the other way, say you drop the voltage from 10 volts in to 1 volt out (numbers are hypothetical but the way they work are physics), at 1 volt out you'll get 10 amps. All things must balance. This is a part of ohms law. That's why you can't get more "Power" out of something than you put into it. People who "Claim" to have done it are charlatans. Liars. Cheats. Those YouTube videos are hoaxes. There are tricks you don't see. They do it so they can sucker people into viewing their channels. They depend on advertisements for an income, and the more you click on their videos the more money they make. There's no science to what they do, it's all lies and trickery. Because of this AAC has instituted a rule saying discussions of "Over Unity" (OU) devices are prohibited. AAC values their website and the reliable information that can come from it. Moderators will lock and remove discussions revolving around OU.

Take our advice, don't continue to pursue this course, it's going to be a waste of your time and probably money as well.

I told you I would share what I know. I don't know everything, so maybe there is something out there that will convert 10 volts 1 amp into 20 volts 1 amp. But it's not going to be a transformer alone. It MUST involve other components. Even then, in the end, all the extra stuff is going to consume power, so your net input will be higher but your net output will never exceed what you put in.

I mentioned real world losses. Copper wire is not a perfect conductor. Transformer's iron cores are not perfect magnetic conduits. Even powder form (wrong term I'm sure) cores (toroids made from iron powder) can not give you more power out than power in. They also have losses. If you have an electronic circuit and it produces even the slightest amount of heat - that heat is part of the losses. Heat is energy. And when you generate heat you're taking power away from something else.
The devices Tony is describing are AMPLIFIERS, which have a separate power input that is different from the signal input. So you can get a lot more out than you supply to the signal input, but it is quite a bit less than the total power input. That is not possible because there is no simple or easy way to create energy. So it all gets back to atomic physics, which an adequate explanation is beyond what can provide.
And on occasion this site ends the threads before we can adequately debunk them. I find the explanations that sometimes are given a bit entertaining, with my favorite question being "How does that work?" Asking for a more complete explanation is a very good way to either shoot-down some preposterous concept or else become educated about something I had not been aware of. On occasion it happens that there are things that I had no knowledge of. Education is handy to get.
 
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