Use a pressure switch to activate a light wirelessly o ask if anyone can

Thread Starter

AU diver

Joined Jan 18, 2020
4
I have limited electrical knowledge so would like to ask if anyone can recommend a solution to a system I would like to have installed. I can have an electrician install it but as it is my concept I would like to identify the best way to configure it.

We use HP air for testing at work and as a safety measure I would like to install pressure switches at our HP air outlets. So anytime someone opens a HP air outlet to do testing, the pressure switch would send a wireless signal to turn on four different wall lights to indicate this to the other technicians walking in and out of the lab so they know to put their eye and ear protection on. Then when the HP air is turned off, the wall lights would turn off respectively.

I am looking for the simplest method/products to send a wireless signal from the pressure switch to the wall lights. We could hard wire it but it would be much better if I can work out how to do it remotely.

Any ideas and links to products would be most appreciated.

Thanks!
Dave
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,404

Thread Starter

AU diver

Joined Jan 18, 2020
4
Put in a piping tee between the shutoff valve and the hose connector for a pressure switch. Normally closed when under pressure and wired to whatever devices you want. Pressure switches typically have adjustable setpoints. https://www.galco.com/buy/Barksdale-Control-Products/96211-BB2-S0479?source=googleshopping&msclkid=f8dbefae4f721bb75aafb18d94e446df&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Shopping - Brands&utm_term=4580153129628361&utm_content=all products

Not wireless but KISS
Thanks, any idea what I can use to communicate from the pressure switch to a light wirelessly?
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,404
Sorry, I'm not a wireless guy but you will need a pressure switch. I'd just tell the plant electrician to wire it up for me back in the day. I just picked out a typical not knowing what air pressure you are working with. Barksdale, Square D and several others make adjustable air pressure switches. And Welcome to AAC!
 

Thread Starter

AU diver

Joined Jan 18, 2020
4
Sorry, I'm not a wireless guy but you will need a pressure switch. I'd just tell the plant electrician to wire it up for me back in the day. I just picked out a typical not knowing what air pressure you are working with. Barksdale, Square D and several others make adjustable air pressure switches. And Welcome to AAC!
Thanks mate, I appreciate the advice.
 

Rich2

Joined Mar 3, 2014
172
We replace a lot of those cheap non adjustable pressure switches on compressed air dryers, they tend to leak after a while. We fit Ranco or Danfoss fully adjustable switches.
 

Sensacell

Joined Jun 19, 2012
2,587
Wireless stuff is not reliable.

This is for safety? Right?

By the time you are finished powering and wiring all the wireless gadgets, or god forbid - messing with batteries, you might as well just hard wire it- then it might actually work when you needed it too.

Let's say you did manage to get the wireless option installed - then 6 months later it stops working? How do you fix it without a ton of fiddling around?

Keep it simple.
 
Last edited:

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
10,470
hi,
I agree with Sensacell, if its a safety critical installation, hard wire it.
Also I would get the installation approved to the local regulations for Health and Safety, you don't want future compensation claims from the employees.
E
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,609
Just as a side note, high pressure is sort of a relative term. I worked quite a bit with high pressure nitrogen which we defined as a 3,500 PSI supply. The pressure drop we would see depended on line size (diameter) and the volume of the space we were filling. We never knew exactly what the drop would be. In your case will it always be the same? Can you define your static "high pressure" limits?

Rather than sensing pressure and trying to work off a pressure drop would it be more practical to maybe look at airflow? For me volume flow here in the US was measured in CFM (Cubic Foot Minute). In your case it sounds like your only concern is if you either have flow or not. Depending on your pressure, pipe diameter, and a few other variables less important you may want to consider looking at flow verse pressure drop.

You may want to call the manufacturer of your compressor device(s) and ask to speak with an applications engineer as to a good way to go about getting to your objective. I would also consider hard wired solutions as was mentioned.

Ron
 

Thread Starter

AU diver

Joined Jan 18, 2020
4
Wireless stuff is not reliable.

This is for safety? Right?

By the time you are finished powering and wiring all the wireless gadgets, or god forbid - messing with batteries, you might as well just hard wire it- then it might actually work when you needed it too.

Let's say you did manage to get the wireless option installed - then 6 months later it stops working? How do you fix it without a ton of fiddling around?

Keep it simple.
T
Just as a side note, high pressure is sort of a relative term. I worked quite a bit with high pressure nitrogen which we defined as a 3,500 PSI supply. The pressure drop we would see depended on line size (diameter) and the volume of the space we were filling. We never knew exactly what the drop would be. In your case will it always be the same? Can you define your static "high pressure" limits?

Rather than sensing pressure and trying to work off a pressure drop would it be more practical to maybe look at airflow? For me volume flow here in the US was measured in CFM (Cubic Foot Minute). In your case it sounds like your only concern is if you either have flow or not. Depending on your pressure, pipe diameter, and a few other variables less important you may want to consider looking at flow verse pressure drop.

You may want to call the manufacturer of your compressor device(s) and ask to speak with an applications engineer as to a good way to go about getting to your objective. I would also consider hard wired solutions as was mentioned.

Ron
Thanks Ron, that makes sense. Might look at a hard wired, more reliable option.
 
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