Urgent help needed with repair

Thread Starter

vickpayne

Joined Nov 3, 2020
6
Hey guys, i need some help. I have short cirquited this resistor. It went out in sparks. I was trying to remove the metal lid on the RAM slots, and the pin that holds the lid got bent and touched the resistor. Pls see the pic attached. Now i dont have the slightest idea what is going to happen to the laptop. I have no idea what is the resistor for, the laptop seem to work, its charging, the battery works just fine, the computer freezes sometimes and the screen goes dark when i plug it on charge but those are very rare cases. The laptop is under warranty, brand new, 3 days old and i have no idea what to do with it. Should i send it for a repair? What the hell do i tell them. Im guessing they wont find any problems and will just send it back to me. Any advice will be helpful.
What do you think the resistor is for?
What is going to happen to the laptop?
How do i send it for a repair without them knowing that it was my fault.

Thank you in advance
 

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sagor

Joined Mar 10, 2019
512
Unless you tell them, they may not be able to tell you "did something". It is entirely possible the "short" happened during assembly and is only now showing up. But, they may be able to detect the shield is bent, so there may be some fallout from that.
Best to send it in and don't explain too much. Touching the resistor may or may not have caused damage, depending where it is in a circuit, and what it does.
Your picture does not show the resistor clearly. If it is actually "blown" or discolored, then they may suspect user fault. Also, shorting that resistor may have caused other damage to other components, one cannot tell by just looking at them.
 

Thread Starter

vickpayne

Joined Nov 3, 2020
6
Unless you tell them, they may not be able to tell you "did something". It is entirely possible the "short" happened during assembly and is only now showing up. But, they may be able to detect the shield is bent, so there may be some fallout from that.
Best to send it in and don't explain too much. Touching the resistor may or may not have caused damage, depending where it is in a circuit, and what it does.
Your picture does not show the resistor clearly. If it is actually "blown" or discolored, then they may suspect user fault. Also, shorting that resistor may have caused other damage to other components, one cannot tell by just looking at them.
Thanks for your reply. There is nothing that looks out of ordinary, i mean the pins were supposed to open and close to hold the protective cover. When i opened them they shorted the resistor. It is blown. This pic is from another laptop, but since the god damn machine is working, i cant just tell them that i know which resistor is blown. Im not supposed to open the laptop at all im guessing. So i have no idea what to do now
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,015
What makes you think the resistor is bad? I can't tell from the picture if it's physically damaged, but resistors are fairly durable. Actually your resistor looks like it might be a capacitor. Can you post a zoomed-in image that is clear?

Edit --> A lesson here; always remove all power (battery and wall plug) from anything electronic before you start poking around. It's too easy to make a clumsy mistake that makes something go poof (we have all done it).
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,015
That looks like a capacitor. Is your second laptop the identical model? Two options; it's near what looks like an inductor, so it might be a filter cap, to reduce electrical noise. Depending on how much margin was engineered in, you could be fine without it. The other good news is it looks to be easily accessible, a relatively easy swap for anyone with experience. If someone could identify the part by either looking at the good laptop, or removing and measuring the one on the good laptop, then that part could be ordered from a place like digikey or mouser (probably a 10c part) and would be a fairly easy fix for anyone with soldering experience.
 

Thread Starter

vickpayne

Joined Nov 3, 2020
6
Thank you very much for your advice. I will check out the guy , i do hope its a filter cap :))) But im guessing i will have to give it to a professional to fix it.
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
2,311
That capacitor is badly damaged but thankfully doesn't appearto be shorting. Its almost certainly one added on a power rail to meet EMI regs so isn't essential for operation - as long as it doesn't fail short later and become a bigger problem. Louis Rossman is a good guy, if a little intense at times... but where in the world are you? Although that's a Lenovo (what model?) someone on his forum may be able to advise better.
 
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Thread Starter

vickpayne

Joined Nov 3, 2020
6
Thanks Irving, i got scared shitless, been wanting this machine for a while now and woud hate to see it damaged just after a couple of days because im a fucking idiot. Should have disconnected the damn battery. Im in the UK, sadly,
Its a Legion 5P 15ARH05H. The problem is that i have no idea what the capacitor is for and how it would affect the system but as MrSoftware said it could be a filter cap. Because i honestly dont see any problems with the machine
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,015
That should be a very easy swap for anyone in the repair business, the more difficult part is finding an honest repair business local to you (shipping all the way to Rossmann would probably cost a lot) and then identifying what value cap that is, unless you can bring the second matching laptop with you.
 
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