TRRS jack on laptops

Thread Starter

Trailer

Joined Jan 22, 2023
57
Hi everyone, I have an HP Envy laptop with TRRS headset jack. I want to use the mic input (as I do on my PC). I DIY a splitter, the speakers are working fine but the system either don't recognize the mic or just mute any input from it the moment I plug it in!!
I searched everywhere including hp support and tried all suggested solution in vain.
Anyone have an idea to make it work or even why it's not working?
P.S I'm aware of both OMTP n CTIA standars and tried both wiring with no success
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,550
If the input is set up for a dynamic microphone then no power/bias voltage, is required. But if the microphone is an electret type, then there must be a bias voltage of the correct polarity for the microphone.
The microphone input is between the second ring and the sleeve connection, I believe that the second ring is the common, but i am not sure about that. But an incorrect polarity will certainly prevent the microphone input from working.
 

Thread Starter

Trailer

Joined Jan 22, 2023
57
If the input is set up for a dynamic microphone then no power/bias voltage, is required. But if the microphone is an electret type, then there must be a bias voltage of the correct polarity for the microphone.
The microphone input is between the second ring and the sleeve connection, I believe that the second ring is the common, but i am not sure about that. But an incorrect polarity will certainly prevent the microphone input from working.
I tried both polarities.. same resilt
 

Thread Starter

Trailer

Joined Jan 22, 2023
57
What sort of mic are you trying to use?
Actually I want to use it as input for simulated oscilloscope software which I'm using on my PC and it's working fine but I want to use it on the laptop for mobility requirements.
I'm plugging a common microphone for operational testing (don't know the type, but it's an old mono mic used with tape recorders)
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,550
"an old mono mic" is not likely to have the correct connections at the mic plug, or have you connected it to that 4-circuit plug already?? Have you done a resistance check between the sleeve and that second ring, which serves as the common connection for the headphones as well?? The resistance should be close to the dynamic microphone's resistance.
Connecting to the circuits in a T RR S plug is a pain, in my experience. So I am thinking that is where the problem lies. In addition, if it is a dynamic microphone, the fairly low resistance compared to an elected mic may be tricking the system into thinking thatit is only a stereo TRS connector and switching off the input function. So there are twopossible things to check.
 

Thread Starter

Trailer

Joined Jan 22, 2023
57
"an old mono mic" is not likely to have the correct connections at the mic plug, or have you connected it to that 4-circuit plug already?? Have you done a resistance check between the sleeve and that second ring, which serves as the common connection for the headphones as well?? The resistance should be close to the dynamic microphone's resistance.
Connecting to the circuits in a T RR S plug is a pain, in my experience. So I am thinking that is where the problem lies. In addition, if it is a dynamic microphone, the fairly low resistance compared to an elected mic may be tricking the system into thinking thatit is only a stereo TRS connector and switching off the input function. So there are twopossible things to check.
There's a 3vDC voltage between the ring and sleeve, resistance is very confusing.. it reads on one direction only as if it's a voltage!!!! Reading -6k on a scale and -2k on the lower scale.. very strange
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,550
Certainly IT IS A VOLTAGE!!! an electret microphone must have a voltage to function. So certainly the microphone will have a bias voltage supplied. That is, presuming that you are measuring the voltage in the connector that the microphone plugs into.
But now I am puzzled as to what type of plug are you plugging in and wanting to work??. An old mono mic will have a tip and sleeve connection., not at all like the trrs connection. And on my HP probook neither the mic input nor the phones output function. But all of the diagnostics say they are all OK.
My suggestion is to get a USB sound input module . And if you ever do get a scope going it will not be a good one.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
11,489
Hi everyone, I have an HP Envy laptop with TRRS headset jack. I want to use the mic input (as I do on my PC). I DIY a splitter, the speakers are working fine but the system either don't recognize the mic or just mute any input from it the moment I plug it in!!
I searched everywhere including hp support and tried all suggested solution in vain.
Anyone have an idea to make it work or even why it's not working?
P.S I'm aware of both OMTP n CTIA standars and tried both wiring with no success
Hi,

The adapters are not that expensive to buy.

If you are making your own, then consider just using a four conductor plug (as usual) and four wires coming out, and touch each wire with a piece of metal or just hold one at a time in your hand until you either hear a scratching sound or a humming sound. When you touch an audio input you usually get a hum out of the speakers. You can not touch any other wires though or the hum may not sound.

Another possibility is that your software has a microphone boost function, that amplifies the microphone signal. It would be a checkbox somewhere in the audio settings.

The hum test will tell you if the system works, and not depend on the microphone. If the amplification is poor though you may not get a hum anyway.

Now that i think about it to get a scratching sound i think you have to short the mic input to ground repeatedly.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,550
Now I am wondering about what is being plugged into that connector. Is it a TRRS plug with connections available for testing??
AND, has the TS been able to verify that the connection actually works using a headset I have an HP laptop and the hadphone output does not work, nor does the microphone input function. The built in speakers work, as does the built in microphone. So the fault might be in the setup.
 

Thread Starter

Trailer

Joined Jan 22, 2023
57
Certainly IT IS A VOLTAGE!!! an electret microphone must have a voltage to function. So certainly the microphone will have a bias voltage supplied. That is, presuming that you are measuring the voltage in the connector that the microphone plugs into.
But now I am puzzled as to what type of plug are you plugging in and wanting to work??. An old mono mic will have a tip and sleeve connection., not at all like the trrs connection. And on my HP probook neither the mic input nor the phones output function. But all of the diagnostics say they are all OK.
My suggestion is to get a USB sound input module . And if you ever do get a scope going it will not be a good one.
Thanks for the reply.. the trrs is a headache.. I'm actually wonna use the mic input to relay a signal to an oscilloscope software. It's working fine on my PC (picture attached).. I don't know why the configuration of the trrs mic connection on a laptop doesn't work the same?
What's the difference between the PC mic input and the trrs mic input?20230716_125225.jpg
 
Last edited:

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,550
I do not like the whole concept of the TRRS four circuit plug and jack because it is too fragile, and subject to intermittent operation if it accumulates any dirt. Also, it does not seem that such plugs are available for repairing headsets where the connection to the plug has failed. I realize that very few folks will even consider repairing a headset, and it does not seem reasonable to run a microphone circuit in intimate contact with headphone conductors.
 

Thread Starter

Trailer

Joined Jan 22, 2023
57
I do not like the whole concept of the TRRS four circuit plug and jack because it is too fragile, and subject to intermittent operation if it accumulates any dirt. Also, it does not seem that such plugs are available for repairing headsets where the connection to the plug has failed. I realize that very few folks will even consider repairing a headset, and it does not seem reasonable to run a microphone circuit in intimate contact with headphone conductors.
Feeling is mutual.. I just wanted my oscilloscope software operational on my laptop for mobility.. didn't thought it's gonna be such a pain in ....
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,550
Have you tried a regular headset with that connection to verify that the connection is actually functional? It might be that there is an operating system issue, or some other software issue that no amount of hardware effort can solve.
 
Top